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The Rising Phoenix Review

Rising Phoenix Review

Letter From the Editor

I know these are difficult times the likes of which many of us have never experienced. I feel the weight of this suffering. The sickness, shattered plans, upended dreams. If I’m honest, I am fucking scared.  As we self quarantined, I felt so isolated. I knew I wanted to help remedy that feeling for as many people as I could.

What I know is we need as many things that add light to the world as possible. As many things as we can make to help bring comfort, affirm our shared humanity, and amplify the voices of those who need to be heard. Connecting with all of you through this publication was always a light in the dark for me. More importantly, this was a space we built together, a place where we could connect people across the world. What I know is we can be…

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My thoughts on the finding of Martha Lost by Caroline Wallace


This book started well. Love the year it’s in and the setting. It felt like a good beginning to a fantasy novel. It kind of felt like The Borrowers or something. Then it went on and didn’t really go anywhere, it faded and i was disappointed because i really liked the opening chapters and the characters and the vibe i was getting, but it didn’t go anywhere.


Liverpool, 1976: Martha is lost.

She’s been lost since she was a baby, abandoned in a suitcase on the train from Paris. Ever since, she’s waited in lost property for someone to claim her. It’s been sixteen years, but she’s still hopeful.

Meanwhile, there are lost property mysteries to solve: a suitcase that may have belonged to the Beatles, a stuffed monkey that keeps appearing. But there is one mystery Martha has never been able to solve – and now time is running out. If Martha can’t discover who she really is, she will lose everything…

amazon (affiliate link) if you’re interested in checking out this book

My thoughts on Breeda Looney Steps Forth by Oliver Sands

Hello. Hope you are all keeping well. Self-isolating here in the UK and getting through my tbr pile. Isolation isn’t far from the norm for me anyway. We have to just stay safe, healthy and look out for each other.



After her mother’s death &a suicide attempt directionless Breeda decides to finally clear out her mum’s house. From there Breeda finds a thread which unravels her entire family. I felt for Breeda. I could all too well identify with her. I was sensitive to her plight. For a debut novel this was an excellent read and had me hooked throughout. I liked the twists and turns, the characters. I switched off completely and got into this book and the ending was satisfactory.

My one issue was Breeda’s surname Looney. I don’t like the word looney, I think it’s a cruel word and what with some of the topics in the book – felt tactless but I understand the word has other origins and this book is based in Ireland, with Irish characters.

I would recommend this book and I will definitely be reading it again.


Breeda Looney tells herself she’s happy with her life in a small Irish fishing village. Sure, there are days she talks to no one but the cat, her Aunt Nora considers her a waste of skin, and her panic attacks have become public spectacles. Still, what’s the use in complaining?

Then Breeda makes a shocking discovery that flips her world upside down. Her father, said to have died when Breeda was a child, might actually still be alive.

Breeda’s search for her father will strain her sanity to its limits, pitting her against her formidable Aunt Nora and forcing her to revisit a dark place she thought she’d buried forever.

And as she digs up the family dirt to find him, Breeda will begin to wonder… has she taken a step too far?


buy link


Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for a Kindle copy of this book in exchange for an honest review

Growing Pains by Isabelle Kenyon releases today

Today is the release date of pamphlet Growing Pains by Isabelle Kenyon.

In ‘Growing Pains’ Isabelle Kenyon navigates the grey space between child and adult. From the playground wars with worms, to the value of a woman’s body as she learns to take up her own space, this collection values kindness in what appears to be an increasingly cruel society.


Available to buy from Fly on the Wall press or the publisher Indigo Dreams Publishing


If you’re more of a fiction reader Isabelle also has had her short story The Town Talks published by Wild Pressed Books this month


Isabelle is the editor of Fly on the Wall Press. A socially conscious independent press.


Fly on the Wall Press have chapbooks available and anthologies packed with great writers. The anthologies raise money for various charities.

Their forthcoming books are packaged in a subscription as well as sold individually. This seems like a good deal to me. I’m really excited about these books.

  1. Grenade Genie by Thomas McColl (a poetry collection)

  2. Identity magazine with poetry, stories & flash fiction selected by author Anna Saunders

  3. House of Weeds by Amy Kean & Jack Wallington (full colour illustrated poetry collection)

  4. No Home in this World by Kevin Crowe (a short story collection


There is too an open call for submissions to their next anthology that is for creatives with Manchester connections.

picture copyright Fly on the Wall Press

Lots to get involved with.

I do think books, poetry & creating are fine ways of getting through the shit.

So much to cram into a blog post, I tried to keep it brief 😬


Hope you’re all well, staying safe & taking care of yourself & others around you.