Non-Fiction books roundup reviews.

No sleep for twenty hours. No food for ten.
And a ward full of soon-to-be mothers…

Midwives are there for us at some of the most challenging, empowering and defining moments of our lives. From heart-wrenching grief to the pure joy of a new-born baby, midwife Leah Hazard has seen it all.

But life on the NHS front line, working within a system at breaking point, is more extreme than you could ever imagine.

Moving and compassionate, funny and unexpected, Leah shares her experiences in this extraordinary love letter to new mothers and fellow midwives everywhere.

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Hard Pushed: A Midwife’s Story by Leah Hazard.

Apparently, I read this book. I have no recollection of it.

Get one pound off of this book at Waterstones.


Welcome to 97-hour weeks. Welcome to life and death decisions. Welcome to a constant tsunami of bodily fluids. Welcome to earning less than the hospital parking meter. Wave goodbye to your friends and relationships… Welcome to the life of a junior doctor. Hilarious, horrifying and heartbreaking by turns, these diaries are everything you wanted to know – and more than a few things you didn’t – about life on and off the hospital ward. And yes, it may leave a scar.

Scribbled in secret after endless days, sleepless nights and missed weekends, comedian and former junior doctor Adam Kay’s This is Going to Hurt provides an essential, brutally frank account of what life is like for the beleaguered vanguard of the NHS. Now providing the groundwork for a sell-out stand-up tour, This is Going to Hurt is an unmissable window into Britain’s ailing health system and the lives of the people who are its lifeblood. Simply essential reading.

Rating: 2 out of 5.

This is Going to Hurt: Secret Diaries of a Junior Doctor by Adam Kay.

Why does everyone rave about this book? I did not like it. I’m so confused.

I didn’t find this book funny. It didn’t read funny. The narrator came across as arrogant and parts of the book were immature. I understand that if those parts of the book were from when he was younger. He made jokes at the expensive of his patients. I don’t have medical knowledge, not all of us do and that is why we take trips to the doctor and the hospital. We don’t have the medical knowledge, we didn’t go to university for that like you did?! Why are you expecting your patients to be on the same wavelength as you? I do get that doctors and nurses are not angels and they are human, with a responsible and stressful job. I at least thought they gave their patients respect.

I appreciated where Adam Kay wrote about long hours and low pay. That I do agree with.

I may have to revisit this book. I haven’t seen a bad review for it. Maybe I wasn’t in the mood when I read it.

Have you read This is Going to Hurt? Did you enjoy reading it?

*This book is currently £5.00 at Book Depository and that’s with free shipping.


Horrifying, heartbreaking and eye-opening, these are the stories, the patients and the cases that have characterised a career spent being a doctor behind bars.



Violence. Drugs. Suicide. Welcome to the world of a Prison Doctor.


Dr Amanda Brown has treated inmates in the UK’s most infamous prisons – first in young offenders’ institutions, then at the notorious Wormwood Scrubs and finally at Europe’s largest women-only prison in Europe, Bronzefield.


From miraculous pregnancies to dirty protests, and from violent attacks on prisoners to heartbreaking acts of self-harm, she has witnessed it all.


In this eye-opening, inspirational memoir, Amanda reveals the stories, the patients and the cases that have shaped a career helping those most of us would rather forget.


Despite their crimes, she is still their doctor.

Rating: 3 out of 5.

The Prison Doctor Dr. Amanda Brown.

Liked. The stories did not all feel fully fleshed out and read short. It is good.

This book is only £3.36 at the moment on Book Depository and that is with free shipping.


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Thoughts on Footballing Memoirs by Cloughie, Taylor & Banks.

Originally published in 1980 and available now for the first time in forty years, With Clough, By Taylor is the definitive account of the partnership that revolutionised English football and the trade of the football manager.


With Clough, By Taylor

Published by Biteback
A story of the early relationship of the legendary football partnership of Clough and Taylor, their playing careers, their managerial careers, and the book caps off just as the pair were enjoying success with Nottingham Forest FC. The football club where the pair lifted numerous trophies.



Banksy

Published by Penguin
A fascinating insight into the early traditions of football, thoroughly well researched, and well written. The book gives a balanced view of life in Sheffield in the 1940s, society and its changes during the war, and how football was consumed, and reflected society as it was then, by the working class. You have to admire the dedication, and hard work that Gordon Banks put into training himself into the amazing goalkeeper that he was for Chesterfield, Leicester, Stoke and England. Gordon Banks gives us his experiences of that ‘66 World Cup win and the subsequent strange goings on during the ‘70 World Cup in Mexico. Astonishing read.


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💭 My thoughts on Redeemable A Memoir of Darkness &Hope by Erwin James.

Title: Redeemable A memoir of Darkness &Hope

Author: Erwin James

Publisher: Bloomsbury

Pages: 355

Date Published: 11th Feb 2016

Rating: 🌟🌟🌟🌟

Amazon / Barnes &Noble / Book Depository / Waterstones / Foyles

One of the things I try to find in a book that is memoir is how that person, from great adversity, turns their life around. Whether that is from a childhood of neglect, or a kind of addiction, or something in later life that causes trauma. Often I don’t think anybody can pinpoint the turning point, because scars can run deeper than surface wounds, and regaining your self-worth, and achieving your goals, can’t be done with a snap of the fingers. With Redeemable A memoir of Darkness and Hope by Erwin James I felt that arc was easy to see. He had an unstable childhood, without any boundaries, after the death of his mother, and then he had problems with alcohol. His life spun out of control. Some of the passages of his years as a young man were harrowing. Eventually Erwin was arrested and sent to prison for murder. It was in prison his attitude began to change. That’s when therapy, talking to someone, and writing about his experiences while in prison helped him to make peace with his past, and himself. I found it inspiring. It’s never easy to change.