good old desk – a poem

a desk was part of the bedroom furniture, as a child –

essential for completing homework on –

and making shapes with play-dough –

and as an adult – practical questions

do we need a desk, is there room?

can we really afford a desk?

use the coffee table for completing paperwork instead –

with laptops on – laps –

slumped on the sofa –

lack of concentration –

Kate ©

No Fee Submission Calls

Bone and Ink Press This is Not a Punk Rock Anthology, It’s a New Wave Anthology DEADLINE 31st of July / ACCEPTS creative non-fic, poetry and fiction

Safe and Sound Press / ACCEPTS flash fiction & poetry

Crossed Paths Mag DEADLINE 1st of August Theme Resilience / ACCEPTS short stories, poems, flash fiction, and personal essays

River Heron Review DEADLINE 15th of August Theme / ACCEPTS poems responding to the current socio-political climate

FEED Lit Mag 750 words or less / ACCEPTS fiction, non-fic, and poetry


3 LGBT+ poetry collections

A debut poetry chapbook exploring queer realisation, self-discovery, and search for acceptance. This sapphic collection features poems ‘Attraction’ and ‘Fraud’ first published by Royal Rose Magazine and ‘TV’ featured in Issue 3 of Constellate Literary Journal. This book was previously published under the pseudonym Elfie. Book Depository

This life-affirming poetry collection reflects on the author’s growth since the ending of her marriage and what it means to unearth one’s true sexual orientation, in mid-life. Anne Walsh Donnelly’s intimate exploration of sexuality and identity is both brave and touching, marking this debut collection as a triumph.; “Anne Walsh Donnelly is by far the most daring poet to emerge in Ireland of late. The starkly honest and overt sexuality which pervades Anne’s poetry make the work of pretty much all her contemporaries appear repressed and backward-looking in comparison. This publication would certainly have been banned in the Ireland of the past. Indeed, she is one of the few poets around whose work has the glorious ability to get moralistic, supposedly liberal eyebrows twitching. Anne’s poems are pretty perfectly formed hand grenades which she tosses about the place with abandon while maintaining a deadpan face. I think this publication is the beginning of something great.” Kevin Higgins, author of Song of Songs 2.0: New & Selected Poems (Salmon Poetry, 2017). Book Depository

“As a poet, Aeon Ginsberg is resourceful with language and imagery, finding metaphor and anecdote where the reader had previously thought language had already dredged all it could out of that instance; as a vocally transgender poet, Aeon Ginsberg is a poignantly necessary voice. There is often a lot of talk in literary communities about what makes a “trans poem” a “trans poem,” and while the majority of Aeon’s poems mention they are trans somewhere within the text, there is never a sense of force or plea; rather, while Aeon’s gender is influential in all aspects of their work, it does not define their work. Aeon’s work is instead profoundly influenced by the daunting task of humanizing and unraveling trauma, from abusive relationships to harassment by customers at their food-service job, and throughout their narrative, Aeon never lies to their audience or sugarcoats the circumstance. Instead, Aeon presents their truth unflinchingly, letting the audience know they’ve got some heavy shit to talk about, but it’s our choice if we want to listen. And goddamn, I am positive y’all will want to listen.” ​–Linette Reeman, writer, performer, Aries. Publisher Link

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Going back to the early 2000’s. What I read as a child.


Hello. Hope you’re ok.


I spent a good chunk of time trying to find one of my favourite reads from my childhood last week and, after finding it, I went on to find other books that unlocked memories. I was born in 1995, not a time of great diversity in publishing if we’re looking at this list and as for Diary of a Chav <puffs out cheeks> I should mention a lot of these books I read because they were there and I could find them in charity shops or the public library. Trying to read a series of books (in order) proved impossible and I liked authors I knew had other books to read. I found comfort in familiarity.
I might try getting a hold of some of these books and re-reading them. Possibly setting myself up for disappointment.


  • Dustbin Baby – Jacqueline Wilson

  • The Granny Project – Anne Fine

  • The Famous Five – Enid Blyton

  • Diary of a Chav – Grace Dent

  • Just Henry – Michelle Magorian

  • Noughts and Crosses – Malorie Blackman

  • Lucky Star – Cathy Cassidy

  • Ally’s World – Karen McCombie

  • The Babysitter’s Club – Ann. M. Martin

  • Blitzed – Robert Swindells

  • The Shell House – Linda Newbury

  • Pink Knickers Aren’t Cool – Jean Ure

  • There’s a Pharaoh in our Bath – Jeremy Strong

  • Matilda – Roald Daul

  • Lady Daisy – Dick King Smith

  • Trust me, I’m A Troublemaker – Pete Johnson

What do you think, have you read any of these books?


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