my thoughts on 2 murder mystery books

 

 

The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie 4/5

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Can you imagine how fun it must be (I’m kidding) sitting down and imagining … these murder scenarios? Do the writers fox themselves? Because characters, even if we do ultimately control them, still do what they damn well like.

I also love Agatha Christie’s dialogue. I think I have said it before in a review, but I bloody love good dialogue. It’s like music to my ears, when you read some dialogue and it has a bit of bite to it and a bit of humour. It’s pleasing. Roddy Doyle is another author that I like for dialogue.



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I think I want dialogue to mirror real life. Which is why there are no rules to writing. You would have dozens of editors complaining if how we spoke to each other was put in our stories. It wouldn’t make sense. Unfinished thoughts, talking over one another, repetition, some coarse language. Of course, accents and dialects too. Do you feel perhaps in stories we try to replicate the perfect scenario? Isn’t that why we read stories, we expect a start, middle and end. I personally love reading stories that don’t really have a story, more happenings. I read a book a couple of months ago like that. It was Keith Waterhouse’s There is a Happy Land. It’s a beautiful book. I probably read it once every couple of years. I don’t have my own copy of it. I know where it is in the public library and I pluck it off the shelves periodically. Pluck is the wrong word. The shelves are packed tightly in my public library and it’s more of a shuffle, tug, pull, shuffle, break a nail and a yank. Then you realise it’s the wrong book and not what you want after all and have to get it back in.


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Anyway, The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was a hit with me. It’s all very clear and obvious whodunnit by the explanation at the end, isn’t it?


Another mystery I read was

Hate Bale: A Rural Cosy Mystery by Stephanie Dogg 3/5

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Hate Bale is very cosy. It has romance, humour and its setting and characters were different (depends what you’ve been reading, I guess) The murders though are brutal, when you think about what you are reading. The ending was wordy, and it went from 60 to 100 in the space of 3? chapters. I felt the plot and the pacing could have been tightened. It did meander, not that I mind a meander. Other readers may not.
Not a bad read though. I liked it.


 

My thoughts on Breeda Looney Steps Forth by Oliver Sands

Hello. Hope you are all keeping well. Self-isolating here in the UK and getting through my tbr pile. Isolation isn’t far from the norm for me anyway. We have to just stay safe, healthy and look out for each other.



After her mother’s death &a suicide attempt directionless Breeda decides to finally clear out her mum’s house. From there Breeda finds a thread which unravels her entire family. I felt for Breeda. I could all too well identify with her. I was sensitive to her plight. For a debut novel this was an excellent read and had me hooked throughout. I liked the twists and turns, the characters. I switched off completely and got into this book and the ending was satisfactory.

My one issue was Breeda’s surname Looney. I don’t like the word looney, I think it’s a cruel word and what with some of the topics in the book – felt tactless but I understand the word has other origins and this book is based in Ireland, with Irish characters.

I would recommend this book and I will definitely be reading it again.


Breeda Looney tells herself she’s happy with her life in a small Irish fishing village. Sure, there are days she talks to no one but the cat, her Aunt Nora considers her a waste of skin, and her panic attacks have become public spectacles. Still, what’s the use in complaining?

Then Breeda makes a shocking discovery that flips her world upside down. Her father, said to have died when Breeda was a child, might actually still be alive.

Breeda’s search for her father will strain her sanity to its limits, pitting her against her formidable Aunt Nora and forcing her to revisit a dark place she thought she’d buried forever.

And as she digs up the family dirt to find him, Breeda will begin to wonder… has she taken a step too far?


buy link


Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for a Kindle copy of this book in exchange for an honest review

My Thoughts on Poetry, short stories and shapeshifter brothers oh my.

Witty, tender, surprising, these keenly observed tales speak to us all, and capture the moment when we all want to roar.

Roar by Cecilia Ahern

Published by HarperCollins
These stories from Cecelia Ahern are a departure from her novels (which I have a lot of time for) and they are chilling. If you look at the list of the stories, some of the stories are a literal as their titles suggest. The stories underline how women are invisible, whatever age: invisible once elderly, put to one side once married.
My one bugbear would be that the characters were all uniform. There was not a great variety in there.


Peppernell understands that healing is a process, and Pillow Thoughts II eloquently captures the time and experience that one goes through on their journey to peace through restoration. A collection of inspirational and comforting poems for anyone who is mending from a broken heart.

Pillow Thoughts 2 by Courtney Peppernell

Published by Andrews McMeel
I enjoyed the writing in Pillow Thoughts 2.
I liked that I could dip in and out of the book.
I found my problem was with the writing, which was impeccable, and an accurate portrayal of falling, and being in love, was so good I couldn’t connect with it, and almost couldn’t finish Pillow Thoughts.


Wicked Origins is a modern YA Fantasy Retelling of L. Frank Baum’s original Oz tales.

Wicked Origins by Paula Black
A retelling of The Wizard of Oz, Paula Black takes elements of the original story and adds them into her own tale. Black’s Dorothy is a hardened character, a child in care who doesn’t trust easy, and lives with Aunt Em and Uncle Henry, and sister. During a tornado her car is taking and lands in the place called Oz, along with her dog Toto. Instead of the Scarecrow, Tinman, and Lion her companions are three shape shifter brothers. The Ruby slippers that Dorothy puts on her feet to save herself from the Munch’kins are boots. The relationship of the brothers and Dorothy develops into a tight unit. I wasn’t convinced by some of the passages in the story. I liked the characters and the dialogue. I will be adding part two to my TBR.


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5, 4, 3. How I choose my books star rating

 

 

 

 

I think of a five-star book as one I couldn’t put down, I didn’t put down, and finished in one sitting. A five-star book is one that put me through the emotional wringer and left me leaving all emosh when I closed its cover. A five-star book is one I am still thinking about three days later, like a half remembered dream some details are hazy others as clear as mud. I would reread a five-star book.

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A four-star book can be just the same as a five-star book in certain aspects, but more of a sporadic read, with less of the emotional wringer and more a huh ok. I wouldn’t necessarily want to read a four-star book again. If I had purchased the book it might be put on the pile heading to the charity shop at some stage. (Not really. I’m a book hoarder)

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A three-star book would be one that I found palatable and passable and potentially brilliant but stumbled on a few aspects. I also find three-star books are ones that had a muddled synopsis, totally confused me, and when I read the book it turned out to be the opposite of what the blurb set me up to expect. Also love triangle troupes usually find themselves with three stars. I cannot with love triangles.
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#BookBlitz. Mae’s Café by Elsa Kurt

Mae’s Cafe
Elsa Kurt
(Welcome To Chance, #1)
Published by: Limitless Publishing
Publication date: June 4th 2019
Genres: Adult, Contemporary, Romance

In Chance, Connecticut, it’s about living the small-town life. Here everyone knows everybody’s business. Gossip and drama spreads like wildfire in this town.

But I’m happy here, content with my little café where locals come together. Even the rich wives-club have their own corner where they can sit around and swap gossip stories. Luckily, I’ve managed to stay off their radar…until a handsome writer arrives in town.

William is older, wiser, and nothing like any other man I’ve met. The attraction between us is instant, and totally unexpected.

While I try to ignore the connection we share, the entire town starts to notice. Suddenly my personal life has become the new topic of conversation.

A twenty-six-year-old falling for an older man is exactly the kind of gossip that can stir a lot of drama in Chance.

Question is, will our newfound love survive being the talk of the town?

Goodreads / Amazon

EXCERPT:

Miles pulled into his parking space, the nose of the black Mercedes nearly touching the signpost that read: Reserved for Miles Hannaford, Broker. He loved that sign almost as much as the one that hung above the door of his building. Hannaford Realty in gold-colored script—Lucinda Calligraphy, he chose it himself—below that, “Where Dreams Become A Realty.” He often had to point out his little play on words, most people were so unobservant.

Brianna was already there, leaning impatiently against the passenger door of her custom color—‘It’s called cashmere,’ she told anyone who’d listen—Limited Edition Jeep Grand Cherokee. Her hair and nails were salon perfect, her outfit—cream-colored, wide leg linen pants and breast hugging, robin’s egg blue blouse—like something off a Saks 5th Avenue mannequin.

“Hey gorgeous, waiting long?” His eyes were on her breasts.

“Eyes up here, asshole. Yes, I’ve been waiting long, long enough to notice that you spelled ‘Reality’ wrong. Look, you forgot the ‘i.’ Nice job,” she scoffed.

“No, it’s supposed to—never mind. Here,” he tossed her the keys which she caught awkwardly, “let yourself in. I got some stuff in the trunk I gotta bring in.”

He didn’t really need to bring in the signs in the trunk, he was stalling. The thing was, Brianna was hot, no question about it. Hell, she was even hotter now than she was in high school. But Ricky was a good guy. And he was built like a house. Not that Miles lacked in any physical capacity. Shit, he was a God damn specimen. Twelve percent body fat. He ran a seven-minute mile, benched two-forty, and was half an inch shy of six feet. Not to mention his full head of thick, wavy, sandy-blond hair. Yes, Miles Hannaford was a fucking specimen, all right. There was a long line of satisfied ladies to attest to that. Including Brianna, who’d come back for more. Which was the problem.


Author Bio:

Elsa Kurt is a multi-genre, indie & traditionally published author to eight contemporary women’s fiction novels, and several romance novellas. She has also penned several children’s books (written as Melanie Cherniack), and a book of empowerment & inspirations based on her life experiences. She is a lifelong New England resident and married mother of two grown children. Visit her website, elsakurt.com, and join her in ‘Finding Beauty in the Imperfections of Life’. Follow Elsa on social media: Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram: @authorelsakurt. Elsa is also on Goodreads, AllAuthor, and YouTube as well.

Website / Goodreads / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

 

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