A Film Noir student, John – Paul George ‘Ringo’ & the residents in a care home strike up alliances. In The Growing Pains of Jennifer Ebert: Aged 19 going on 90 by David M. Barnett.

  • Book Review

  • The Growing Pains of Jennifer Ebert Aged 19 going on 90

  • David M. Barnett

  • Trapeze

(ARC sent by the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review)

AMAZON / BN / WATERSTONES / INDIEBOUND

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Jennifer is a student, studying film noir. With student accommodation not yet built she is living off campus temporarily in a nursing home. The home is, somewhat, unique. It is home to five elderly residents and owned by the Granges. Joining Jennifer are fellow students Liverpudlian John – Paul George ‘Ringo’ and Bo Liu and Lling Liu.
There are a few secrets in the book, and I never knew which characters I could trust. Jennifer, in her opinion, is boring and so takes on a whole different persona in her new surroundings. She is so self-absorbed, I have to quote Hermione Granger and say ‘oh stop feeling all misunderstood,’ to her. She also lies about something HUGE, and when the lie is revealed she doesn’t seem to realise how wrong that it is. When will it click Jennifer?!


potter
Via GIPHY

The residents in the nursing home, on one hand, did feel like clichés, and Ringo did not convince me as a character, but are very amusing and I laughed out loud at a lot of their exchanges; with the discussions between the two groups about ‘when they were young’, Brexit and how the young are more self-absorbed than their generation. Typical stuff, really.
There is a mystery in the book, and I kind of felt the author didn’t know whether to go all in with that part of the story or not, and so I was underwhelmed by the ending as it seemed so at odds with other parts of the book, where all the residents are bonding, going out and getting drunk, and with everyone working together to stop the home from closing. There is a poignancy to the book, about aging, and loneliness, and in being happy with who you are, and who your family are.

I took from the book the message that our experiences from childhood, what beliefs we are brought up with, and the gripes and grudges we hold onto all our lives can impact us in different ways, leaving us unfulfilled. We must choose to change or remain entrenched in our prejudices.


Bad Mommy Stay Mommy by Elisabeth Horan – a book of powerful poetry

https://wp.me/pZdnF-pQ

The Northern Reader Joules Barham has reviewed Bad Mommy Stay Mommy by Elizabeth Horan as part of the Random Things Tours. Published by Fly on the Wall Poetry Press in 4 days time. I haven’t read it myself yet, but I’m looking forward to it. Elizabeth Horan is an incredible poet. Click the link above to read the review.

Pre-Order

Amazon Kindle is only £3.99 Publisher Shop £6.99 Paperback (Cover Art by Amy Alexander)

Book Review. Book Love by Debbie Tung.

 

 

 

  • Book Love

  • Debbie Tung

  • Andrews McMeel Publishing

  • 1449494285 / 978- 1449494285

  • Kindle / Hardback available Amazon 


booklovetung
The perfect book for book lovers, covering our relationships with our nearest bookstore, to that we have with the characters inside of the books. Immediately relatable. The comics are great, some of the details in the illustrations brilliant. Book Love also advocates why books are the best gifts, the benefits of reading, an illustrated list of some amazing books, and a book lover’s consternation at why book covers with the movie poster is NOT the same book. Book Love has it all. The perfect coffee table book. If anyone asks you that age old question why do you read direct them to Book Love by Debbie Tung. If they still don’t it get after reading that all hope is lost for them.


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Poetry Book Review: If My Body Could Speak

Jeremy writes brilliant book reviews! I’ve also read If my Body could Speak and it’s as good as Jeremy’s review suggests. Jeremy has a great collection of poetry you should check out too. It’s called Welcome to the Sombre Days.

Poetry by Jeremy

I couldn’t quite put “If My Body Could Speak” down, but I couldn’t finish it in one sitting because each poem tore me apart (it was intense beauty). Baird writes about anorexia, being queer, sexual assault, misogyny, and much more. In each of these topics, she writes from a place of honesty, of hurt — it demands the reader to listen, to feel the pain she goes through.

Right off the bat, she
starts with the poem “When the Fat Girl Gets Skinny,” which had gone viral when
Baird performed it. I was struck by several stanzas, but perhaps my favourite
lines are the ending:

when I was little,
someone asked me

what I wanted to be
when I grow up

and I said,

small

When the Fat Girl Gets Skinny

Even when taken out of
the context of the poem, these lines…

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