good old desk – a poem

a desk was part of the bedroom furniture, as a child –

essential for completing homework on –

and making shapes with play-dough –

and as an adult – practical questions

do we need a desk, is there room?

can we really afford a desk?

use the coffee table for completing paperwork instead –

with laptops on – laps –

slumped on the sofa –

lack of concentration –

Kate ©

My Thoughts on the autobiography My Name is Why by poet Lemn Sissay.

At the age of 17, after a childhood in an fostered family followed by six years in care homes, Norman Greenwood was given his birth certificate. He learned that his real name was not Norman. It was Lemn Sissay. He was British and Ethiopian. And he learned that his mother had been pleading for his safe return to her since his birth.  

Here Sissay recounts his life story. It is a story of neglect and determination. Misfortune and hope. Cruelty and triumph.  

Sissay reflects on a childhood in care, self-expression and Britishness, and in doing so explores the institutional care system, race, family and the meaning of home. Written with all the lyricism and power you would expect from one of the nation’s best-loved poets, this moving, frank and timely memoir is the result of a life spent asking questions, and a celebration of the redemptive power of creativity.


Rating: 4 out of 5.

It doesn’t feel right to say I enjoyed reading this book, because this is a non-fiction book on Sissay’s childhood in care and

You know I read non-fiction and when I read stories on children that have grown up in the care system, it’s a broke system. We have broke systems throughout this country.

It’s a read, is what I will say. Read it. Then go read the man’s poetry too.


Want to point out, not readable electronically. There are case notes throughout the book and they are hard to read. Buy the book http://Waterstones or you can listen to it for free with an audible trial.

Contains affiliate links. Doesn’t cost you anything, helps me out if you click on ‘em. Thank you.

Growing Pains by Isabelle Kenyon releases today

Today is the release date of pamphlet Growing Pains by Isabelle Kenyon.

In ‘Growing Pains’ Isabelle Kenyon navigates the grey space between child and adult. From the playground wars with worms, to the value of a woman’s body as she learns to take up her own space, this collection values kindness in what appears to be an increasingly cruel society.


Available to buy from Fly on the Wall press or the publisher Indigo Dreams Publishing


If you’re more of a fiction reader Isabelle also has had her short story The Town Talks published by Wild Pressed Books this month


Isabelle is the editor of Fly on the Wall Press. A socially conscious independent press.


Fly on the Wall Press have chapbooks available and anthologies packed with great writers. The anthologies raise money for various charities.

Their forthcoming books are packaged in a subscription as well as sold individually. This seems like a good deal to me. I’m really excited about these books.

  1. Grenade Genie by Thomas McColl (a poetry collection)

  2. Identity magazine with poetry, stories & flash fiction selected by author Anna Saunders

  3. House of Weeds by Amy Kean & Jack Wallington (full colour illustrated poetry collection)

  4. No Home in this World by Kevin Crowe (a short story collection


There is too an open call for submissions to their next anthology that is for creatives with Manchester connections.

picture copyright Fly on the Wall Press

Lots to get involved with.

I do think books, poetry & creating are fine ways of getting through the shit.

So much to cram into a blog post, I tried to keep it brief 😬


Hope you’re all well, staying safe & taking care of yourself & others around you.