My Thoughts on this fun & witty mystery – Death Around the Bend by T. E. Kinsey

Waterstones

Rating: 4 out of 5.

A romp, I think is fair, to describe the Lady Hardcastle mysteries. Aside from liking the setting, the era it is in, the characters, and the plots of the books, it is the dialogue which delights me. When I used to write my own stories, I was often praised by the people who read it how authentic my dialogue was (not that I am bragging) Couple that with my love of television sitcoms and film, I appreciate good dialogue. T. E. Kinsey’s dialogue, particularly between Florence Armstrong and Lady Hardcastle, is a joy because it has wit and speed.

Are these books going to be everyone’s cup of tea/coffee/squash etc? No. If you like a fast-paced book, this isn’t for you. But give it a go. I’m sure I said in *an other review, but that the protagonists are female in this series. That’s everything. I want to see Florence as a character on my TV screen.

*thought this sentence was broke until I realised that should be another


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Round-up of Books I have bought recently

Do I need any more books?

No. no I don’t, but – beside the point.


Here are some of the books I downloaded/were approved to read on Netgalley recently.

Quit like a Woman The Radical Choice to Not Drink in a Culture Obsessed with Alcohol – Holly Whitaker

The Book Depository

This cost 1 pound something. I had to get this book because I have wanted to read it for a while. I followed Holly on Instagram and it took me ages to realise she had a book. A book that people are expressing is a great read, which isn’t necessarily a good thing. We will see.  

Rising Strong – Brene Brown

The Book Depository

This cost less than a pound. The author came recommended. Another book where I might learn something.

Cow Girl – Kirsty Eyre

Waterstones

Cow Girl was an approved title from Netgalley. Cows and a terrible pun on the cover did it for me. It looks good. A Sunday evening read.

Hickory Dickory Dock – Agatha Christie

It was free. You know I love Christie’s dialogue, more than anything. It’s a Poirot mystery, I prefer Marple. Might have read it in the past.  

Waterstones

Driftwood – Marya Layth

I really liked what Marya was posting from this book on her Instagram feed and eventually thought to buy the book. Proceeds from Driftwood are going to Futures Without Violence a Covid-19 response to helping kids and adults get away from abusive situations.


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my thoughts on 2 murder mystery books

 

 

The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie 4/5

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Can you imagine how fun it must be (I’m kidding) sitting down and imagining … these murder scenarios? Do the writers fox themselves? Because characters, even if we do ultimately control them, still do what they damn well like.

I also love Agatha Christie’s dialogue. I think I have said it before in a review, but I bloody love good dialogue. It’s like music to my ears, when you read some dialogue and it has a bit of bite to it and a bit of humour. It’s pleasing. Roddy Doyle is another author that I like for dialogue.



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I think I want dialogue to mirror real life. Which is why there are no rules to writing. You would have dozens of editors complaining if how we spoke to each other was put in our stories. It wouldn’t make sense. Unfinished thoughts, talking over one another, repetition, some coarse language. Of course, accents and dialects too. Do you feel perhaps in stories we try to replicate the perfect scenario? Isn’t that why we read stories, we expect a start, middle and end. I personally love reading stories that don’t really have a story, more happenings. I read a book a couple of months ago like that. It was Keith Waterhouse’s There is a Happy Land. It’s a beautiful book. I probably read it once every couple of years. I don’t have my own copy of it. I know where it is in the public library and I pluck it off the shelves periodically. Pluck is the wrong word. The shelves are packed tightly in my public library and it’s more of a shuffle, tug, pull, shuffle, break a nail and a yank. Then you realise it’s the wrong book and not what you want after all and have to get it back in.


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Anyway, The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was a hit with me. It’s all very clear and obvious whodunnit by the explanation at the end, isn’t it?


Another mystery I read was

Hate Bale: A Rural Cosy Mystery by Stephanie Dogg 3/5

hatebale
Hate Bale is very cosy. It has romance, humour and its setting and characters were different (depends what you’ve been reading, I guess) The murders though are brutal, when you think about what you are reading. The ending was wordy, and it went from 60 to 100 in the space of 3? chapters. I felt the plot and the pacing could have been tightened. It did meander, not that I mind a meander. Other readers may not.
Not a bad read though. I liked it.


 

My Thoughts on Death Beside the Seaside by T. E. Kinsey

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Death Beside the Seaside by T E Kinsey

Published by Thomas & Mercer

Published 22nd October 2019

Amazon


I have read one of the Lady Hardcastle mysteries by T.E. Kinsey before. I wasn’t completely sold on it. I downloaded Death Beside the Seaside because I wanted to give these characters and author another go. I could not put Death Beside the Seaside down. I had to read it right through. I love the era in which this series is written and more so I love the relationship Lady Hardcastle and her maid, and friend, Florence Armstrong have. The dialogue between the two in this book is spot on.


Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for an ARC copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.