Growing Pains by Isabelle Kenyon releases today

Today is the release date of pamphlet Growing Pains by Isabelle Kenyon.

In ‘Growing Pains’ Isabelle Kenyon navigates the grey space between child and adult. From the playground wars with worms, to the value of a woman’s body as she learns to take up her own space, this collection values kindness in what appears to be an increasingly cruel society.


Available to buy from Fly on the Wall press or the publisher Indigo Dreams Publishing


If you’re more of a fiction reader Isabelle also has had her short story The Town Talks published by Wild Pressed Books this month


Isabelle is the editor of Fly on the Wall Press. A socially conscious independent press.


Fly on the Wall Press have chapbooks available and anthologies packed with great writers. The anthologies raise money for various charities.

Their forthcoming books are packaged in a subscription as well as sold individually. This seems like a good deal to me. I’m really excited about these books.

  1. Grenade Genie by Thomas McColl (a poetry collection)

  2. Identity magazine with poetry, stories & flash fiction selected by author Anna Saunders

  3. House of Weeds by Amy Kean & Jack Wallington (full colour illustrated poetry collection)

  4. No Home in this World by Kevin Crowe (a short story collection


There is too an open call for submissions to their next anthology that is for creatives with Manchester connections.

picture copyright Fly on the Wall Press

Lots to get involved with.

I do think books, poetry & creating are fine ways of getting through the shit.

So much to cram into a blog post, I tried to keep it brief 😬


Hope you’re all well, staying safe & taking care of yourself & others around you.

No Fee LIST of Submission Calls

I don’t know about you, but I am aiming to get more of my writing published this year. This blog is a (short!) list of literary journals/publications that are accepting writing & art at the moment. Don’t forget to read the guidelines on their website, they can vary from publication to publication!

If you have any questions about the whole submitting your writing process feel free to ask in the comments & I’ll try & answer. Continue reading “No Fee LIST of Submission Calls”

My Thoughts on Finding Dorothy by Elizabeth Letts.

Behind the most famous movie ever made is a tale of love, magic and one incredible woman

Finding Dorothy by Elizabeth Letts

Published by Quercus

The film of The Wizard of Oz, made in 1939 and which starred Judy Garland, was a magical film for me as a kid. I loved the yellow brick road, the songs, the scarecrow and the evil witch. I also enjoyed its (unofficial) 1985 sequel Return to Oz. That film terrified me more so than the first. It had rocks with faces, The Wheelers, Pumpkinhead, and a headless witch. When I read the books I felt the 1985 sequel was a lot more closer to its author L. Frank Baum original stories.
As I grew up I became interested in how the movies were made, Judy Garland and her life and in the writer of these magical books.

Finding Dorothy by Elizabeth Letts is a fictional story of a young Maud with her mother Matilda Joselyn Gage, an advocate of women’s rights, who first and foremost wants her daughter to get her diploma before engaging with the playwright actor and creator of Oz L. Frank Baum and the then elderly Maud on the filmset of the film of The Wizard of Oz. Maud meets the actors (normally whilst on a cigarette break) and tries to ensure the film script is in keeping to her late husband’s books, whilst protecting the welfare of a young Judy Garland.

What is as engaging is what happens in the intervening years between these two points. The story is written within the framework of what we know about the life of Maud and Frank, as well as their families.

Finding Dorothy has several different women characters in various circumstances. It demonstrates the hardships during the turn of the century and the growth of industry and land in America in the late 1800s. There is a lot in the book to think about. None more so than the question of rights that women had in the eighteenth century and later on in the nineteenth century.
Were women any better off, did they have more autonomy of their choices? Are the societal, the family values and traditions pressures any different?
I felt I had fallen right into a story of another time and era that had me enthralled and emotionally invested in its characters. I whizzed through this book.


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Picture Prompts. Time.

There are various methods we can use to tell the time, and many ways in which we use time for. I always find photos are useful for prompting a new piece of writing. I hope these help you too. 

Apparatus

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Seasons

 

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Photo by Tim Gouw on Pexels.com

 

Occasions

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Image by Annie Spratt from Pixabay

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Grim, Gripping and Excellent Story Telling. The Doll Factory by Elizabeth MacNeal.

The Doll Factory

By Elizabeth MacNeal

Pan MacMillan

Amazon // Waterstones //

df


Silas is a loner, somebody who is a taxidermist. He is on the fringes of society of London in 1850.
Iris is a dissatisfied young woman who works for the horrible Mrs Salter, long hours painting the faces of china dolls at the doll emporium, alongside twin Rose. She is then given the opportunity to realise her dream and live a life she didn’t think was possible.
You also have the character of Albi, a child who introduces the two, and is involved as a go between the two.
It is a grim, bleak read. You can almost smell and feel the world between these pages, the descriptions were that good. You could say the build up was slow, but it’s so gripping in its story, the insights of Victorian life for women, the inequality, amid the backdrop of the Crystal Palace being built.
The ending was gripping. By then I was on the edge of my seat. I was almost on the floor. There’s a twist too, which I didn’t see coming and how the author could do that.

Not for those with a faint heart, The Doll Factory is grim, gripping, and excellent story telling. The Doll Factory had almost everything I love to read in a fiction novel.


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