Growing Pains by Isabelle Kenyon releases today

Today is the release date of pamphlet Growing Pains by Isabelle Kenyon.

In ‘Growing Pains’ Isabelle Kenyon navigates the grey space between child and adult. From the playground wars with worms, to the value of a woman’s body as she learns to take up her own space, this collection values kindness in what appears to be an increasingly cruel society.


Available to buy from Fly on the Wall press or the publisher Indigo Dreams Publishing


If you’re more of a fiction reader Isabelle also has had her short story The Town Talks published by Wild Pressed Books this month


Isabelle is the editor of Fly on the Wall Press. A socially conscious independent press.


Fly on the Wall Press have chapbooks available and anthologies packed with great writers. The anthologies raise money for various charities.

Their forthcoming books are packaged in a subscription as well as sold individually. This seems like a good deal to me. I’m really excited about these books.

  1. Grenade Genie by Thomas McColl (a poetry collection)

  2. Identity magazine with poetry, stories & flash fiction selected by author Anna Saunders

  3. House of Weeds by Amy Kean & Jack Wallington (full colour illustrated poetry collection)

  4. No Home in this World by Kevin Crowe (a short story collection


There is too an open call for submissions to their next anthology that is for creatives with Manchester connections.

picture copyright Fly on the Wall Press

Lots to get involved with.

I do think books, poetry & creating are fine ways of getting through the shit.

So much to cram into a blog post, I tried to keep it brief 😬


Hope you’re all well, staying safe & taking care of yourself & others around you.

📍 Getting Published Literary Magazines Journals & Zines Themes & Deadlines

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I have no idea if this post has been of any use to anyone, but do share links in the comments if you have had anything published in the last few months. Lets support each other!


(List will be amended as and when. Always check the publisher websites and social media pages for details and deadline changes)


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This is Not a Spectacle. Isabelle Kenyon.

 

 

A copy of the gorgeous second edition of This is Not a Spectacle by Isabelle Kenyon. 

She also writes flash fiction. Her flash fiction piece The News was published by Selcouth Station and I was blown away. Read it here

Find Isabelle on Twitter @Kenyon_Isabelle or at her website here 


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Four Questions with Holly Lyn Walrath ( @hollylynwalrath )

 

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Holly Lyn Walrath IMG_8359_large_cropped

 

Website // Twitter // Instagram // Amazon // Goodreads


 

 

1. Tell us about you, and your writing (themes, influences, etc.)

 

 

 

I like to self-identify as a “weird writer,” which basically applies to everything I do creatively. I don’t write in one specific length but tend to flit between poetry, flash fiction, and now I’m even working on a novella. I write in a variety of genres from sci-fi to fantasy, but all of my work tends to have a weird, speculative, fantastical, or surreal element.

 

 

 

I think one of the themes I’m working through right now is what it means to be a woman in today’s world and more specifically how we can gain strength from reimagining our bodies as fantastic. My work often deals with the emotions of guilt and grief. A reviewer called my latest book, Glimmerglass Girl, “at once violent and delicately beautiful,” and I think that basically sums it up. I like dark things, but I want to show people how they can be beautiful.

 

 

 

2. What are some of the ways in which you promote your work, and do you find these add, or eat into, your time writing?

 

 

 

This is a never-ending struggle for me! My work appears on Amazon, Goodreads, Twitter, Facebook, Medium, and a variety of other little caverns on the internet. It’s a lot of work to keep everyone up to date on my work right now because I’m in a very prolific period of writing and I’ve been so blessed to have many people support my work. Even though I often feel burnt out, I recognize that it’s important for writers to promote their own work. No one else can shout the praises of your work as well as you. Who else is going to say, “I love this weird little thing that I pulled out of myself, won’t you take it home with you and love it too?”

 

 

 

3. What projects are you working on at present?

 

 

 

Right now I’m finishing up revisions on my space-opera-pirates-thanos-y novella. (Official title TBD, ha.) It’s basically about a character whose battling her own inner demons. I’m also working on a series of tiny poems that I hope to make into a book. And there’s still my erasure poetry series to finish, which is all erasures of male canonical authors. Uhh… did I mention I’m an overachiever??

 

 

 

4. What does poetry mean to you?

 

 

 

Edward Hirsch, one of my favorite poets, says that “Reading poetry is an adventure in renewal, a creative act, a perpetual beginning, a rebirth of wonder.” He talks about how the poem has to journey a very long way to get to the reader—all the way from inside my weird mind to the page, where I just hope that the right reader will find it. But to me, when you find a poem that speaks to you, it’s like lightning has struck a dark place. Everything becomes clear and brilliant. That’s my goal in writing poetry—to shine a light into the dark crevices of the world. To build a bridge. To burn a hole in a paper and then view the sun through it.


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