at the door – a poem

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my backpack sits slumped over

from where it was thrown –

coming in from going out –

gathering dust –

and when lockdown was announced

there the backpack remained –

the shoes piled around it,

like loose stones around a rock –

the contents of time suspended –

loose mints, and receipts –

a water bottle, and pens separated

from their lids –

pads and wipes –

lip balm –

a notebook –

and until i remembered

to throw it in the bin –

some days later –

a half-eaten lunch –

i didn’t dare to peel back the foil it was wrapped in.

Kate ©

Shiny new books & opportunities

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Hello. Hope you are ok.

Fiona Thomas’s new book is out in ebook format. Fiona is such a help when it comes to being A Freelance Writer and I’m looking forward to reading her new book. The Paperback is out in October. Get pre-ordering!

Writer hq have rounded up a bundle of writing opportunities and competitions.

I have also been reading Ache by Scarlett Ward. I have waited to read this for ages. The publisher Verve Poetry Press is still open for manuscripts and pamphlets until Midnight today. Get submitting!

Don’t forget Fly on the Wall Poetry press’ new issue comes out July 1st and my poem is included it. Download at this link here.


Pre-orders help the publisher gauge interest and get the book buzz before publication!


Contains affiliate links. Doesn’t cost you anything, helps me out if you click on ‘em. Thank you.

Pocket Poems, a read for the summer

Digital Download

12 micro-poems that follow the arc of the start of a summer to its end. These vary from traveling the subway, favourite ice cream flavours & to ‘memories – fleeting passengers / all of irregular shapes,’

Poems taken from my book Here comes the Sun. Published in 2017.

Buy link

My Thoughts on the beautifully written Shelf Life by Livia Franchini

Ruth is thirty years old. She works as a nurse in a care home and her fiance has just broken up with her. The only thing she has left of him is their shopping list for the upcoming week.

Starting with six eggs, and working through spaghetti and strawberries, apples and tea bags, this inventive novel builds a picture of a woman defined by the people she serves; her patients, her friends, and, most of all, her partner of ten years. Without him, Ruth needs to find out – with conditioner and single cream and a lot of sugar – who she is when she stands alone.

With her fresh unpredictable style, Franchini skewers modern relationships and toxic masculinity, moving effortlessly between humour and heartbreak to tell the story of a woman rebuilding herself on her own terms.

The Book Depository</a

Rating: 1.5 out of 5.

Oh no, this is going to be negative.

First off, the synopsis isn’t accurate. Don’t expect what the synopsis tells you.

I wasn’t sure about the shopping list idea, its execution. The book has the narrative in the format of dreams and emails. Skipped some of that because I didn’t find it relevant.

The characters are not likable. Ruth is the protagonist and I liked her in some of the parts of the book. I could relate to her confusion of social cues, friendships and sexual experiences. It took me a while to read Shelf Life because I felt disinterested and distant from the characters. Ruth’s ex is a worry. He’s a worrying character.

There is no doubt the writing is excellent. It might be enough for me to read another book in the future by the author.  The hardback book, which I borrowed from my public library, is beautiful. The story itself was muddled.

Disappointed.


Contains affiliate links. Doesn’t cost you anything, helps me out if you click on ‘em.