good old desk – a poem

a desk was part of the bedroom furniture, as a child –

essential for completing homework on –

and making shapes with play-dough –

and as an adult – practical questions

do we need a desk, is there room?

can we really afford a desk?

use the coffee table for completing paperwork instead –

with laptops on – laps –

slumped on the sofa –

lack of concentration –

Kate ©

Lunchtime Review. Almost Adults by Ali Pantony.

You know when you’re going through a period of depression and you aren’t reading anything, then you clap eyes on a book and it’s just what you need to get excited about reading again? That was Almost Adults. Since I read this book on Monday I have finished two more. This is what I am like on a reading streak.

 

 

Almost Adults 

By Ali Pantony

Ebury Publishing 

Amazon

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In Almost Adults nothing out of the ordinary happens, it is a story of a group of friends navigating their way through … life. Relationships, breakups, unemployment, grief, and a lot more besides. I loved the dynamic of this group and found myself envying their friendship. I liked the whatsapp messaging they used to communicate too. I found I could relate to every one of them in some small way, although Edele is definitely me. One thing I felt was that some of the thoughts and dialogue were cliched and written in to give the story some morals. There is also a lot of drinking in the book, which could be triggering for some.
As an Almost Adult I loved this book, it was easy enough to read in one afternoon and there wasn’t any of it I didn’t enjoy. It’s modern, it’s true and the characters are great.


 

Feeling like an Imposter.

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Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Imposter Syndrome is very very real right now. 

I have always been very good at the writing part of … writing, and not so much at the discipline of editing, and whatnot. Ever since the bug of poetry bit me at the age of sixteen I have written continually on whatever bits of paper I might find laying around, with whichever pen might happen to work. I joined a writing site soon after that and enjoyed interacting and sharing my writing with a community of other likeminded people. I started sending some of those poems to literary publications when I was eighteen. And now I am twenty-three, I have had my poems published online and in print. I have met and read a lot of writers online in that time too. Sometimes it seems the only thing that keeps me sane. I love discovering new writers.

 
Writing has always been my way of communication from when I was a little girl. Writing this I cringe a little inside because I am more comfortable writing from a poem point of view, than from my own. That’s because I’m not a confident person and don’t like to share my thoughts outwardly because of fear of people telling me I’m wrong or being stupid. I keep reminding myself I’m an adult now and not a child, but coping mechanisms die hard!

 
I guess writing, and poetry stopped me from becoming lonely too. I was a very quiet, sensitive, and shy child, and I often felt shunned by family, teachers, friends. Writing reminded me I was alive at times, that I had some kind of power. Reading has that same impact too. Words can become a healing balm.

 
Over the last few months I have felt shut out from poetry, and a little adrift from the community. It seems like it has become a popularity contest? I have gotten into the nasty habit of comparison with fellow poets. Why are they being published and I’m not? What’s wrong with my voice? Do you read my poetry and recognize how uneducated I am, how limited my vocabulary can be because of where I’m from? 

Any suggestions on how to beat Imposter Syndrome?


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Does technology make us more or less likely to be lonely?

 

 

 

Loneliness comes in various guises. Sometimes you want to connect, to talk with somebody. Desperately wanting to know someone is willing to talk with you. Sometimes it’s that ache of needing to be hugged, because it’s been so long. Other times it’s just wanting a laugh and forgetting you live half of your life inside your own head. It’s knowing you don’t have a friend to tag in giveaways on Twitter, won’t need an extra seat, and second guessing every damn decision you make. 

I remember feeling the loss when I was rejected by friends as a seven-year-old. Friends that thought I was a little bit strange, intense, overzealous.
For me it is ingrained now, loneliness. I find my own solutions, sometimes through poetry, and other times good old Google helps me out.

 
Does technology make us more or less likely to be lonely? I don’t know.

 

It is different for everybody. I didn’t grow up with technology the likes we have now. I remember tapes and VHS and floppy discs and the house phone. When I begin to use the internet in my late teens I found community and people that I could engage with. It’s incredibly easy to talk to people online when you aren’t so used to it offline. Which is where I have to say it’s about balance. If life offline is OK then it’s much easier to regulate what you are doing online. You won’t be vulnerable to coming into contact with that disease called scroll and compare.


everything is connected neon light signage
Photo by Daria Shevtsova on Pexels.com

 

 

 

 

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A Who Review & a little bit about one of my first loves.

Doctor Who changed my life. I wasn’t an avid watcher when the iconic TV show returned in 2005, with Christopher Ecclestone as the time travelling Doctor, but t didn’t take me long to fall hard for the show though. One thing that the show taught me was that anything is possible, and that there is a lot more to our world than you could ever imagine. David Tennant played the role of the Doctor after Chris and during my teenage years, when I had depression and anxiety, the show became my escape.

The publishing imprint Target published books which were novelisations of Doctor Who episodes. They were first published in the sixties, and continued to be throughout the eighties, by various writers that had written episodes for the TV series. Nowadays that series of books have evolved, with a different publisher, hardback editions, and emerging writers writing the stories (a fan dream)

rosewho3d

So I was a little bit excited to find that the original Target books had returned, and feature novelisations of Twenty-First century episodes. Rose was the episode that started it all in 2005 and will always have a place in my heart. I can remember vividly how bloody creepy the mannequins that creaked and smashed their way from shop windows and onto the streets of London were. The bits that were cut from the actual episode are included in the book and add something new to the story. It’s also nice to read the story from Rose’s perspective and get a little more background of her and boyfriend Mickey’s childhood and what it was like for them growing up. I am not a huge fan of Rose’s character. I always thought she would have been one of the mean girls in school. Avoid.

I feel so geeky writing this review, because I was routinely taken the piss out of at school for liking Doctor Who waaaay to much. 😂 😭

Honestly, if someone likes something, and wants to talk about it for a few hours just be encouraging, and kind, not like ‘ha ha, you’re weird,’ Some of us are too sensitive for this kind of ribbing.


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