Finding Henry Applebee by Celia Reynolds

Waterstones

Foyles for books

The story of Henry Applebee is primarily narrated by the man himself, although characters Ariel and Travis do take parts in being protagonists. The timeline of the story switches between past and present. I was unsure of this book at first, until I got the gist of which path the story was going to take. Not that it is predictable. There is a huge build up, you have to wait for it though. I liked the setting of the train station in the present and loved being in Blackpool for the past. This is a story of lost love and once you discover how Henry met this woman and lost her because of his insecurities (and mobile phones hadn’t been invented) it did make my eyes mist over.

Unfortunately, the story lost its way in its conclusion. I felt like the author was trying to repeat what happened to Henry with Ariel and Travis, who all meet on the train. I didn’t feel invested in the other characters as much. The ending is not automatically a happy one, which is realistic.

My final thoughts are I loved (ha) the love story in Finding Henry Applebee. The other parts not so much. It is set partly during World War 2, so if you like reading historical fiction books, I’m sure you will like this. I’m probably going to read this book again and love it.


Contains affiliate links. Doesn’t cost you anything, helps me out if you click on ‘em. Thank you.

My Thoughts on Death Beside the Seaside by T. E. Kinsey

20190927_132826_0000.png
deathebethesea3d

Death Beside the Seaside by T E Kinsey

Published by Thomas & Mercer

Published 22nd October 2019

Amazon


I have read one of the Lady Hardcastle mysteries by T.E. Kinsey before. I wasn’t completely sold on it. I downloaded Death Beside the Seaside because I wanted to give these characters and author another go. I could not put Death Beside the Seaside down. I had to read it right through. I love the era in which this series is written and more so I love the relationship Lady Hardcastle and her maid, and friend, Florence Armstrong have. The dialogue between the two in this book is spot on.


Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for an ARC copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.


Currently on the TBR

 

New books to read are always exciting. 

This week I downloaded two books that are currently free onto my Kindle. 

Gretchen Gomez and Shelby Eileen are two very very good writers so if you want to fall in love with some new writers download them both.

welcometogodehunt

Books borrowed from my public library

Rage Becomes Her Soraya Chemaly I have been seeing this book all over my Instagram and curiosity got the better of me

Feminists don’t wear Pink and other lies Scarlett Curtis Scarlett has a new book out, I saw this in the library and decided to check it out and have another read before I get her new book 

Death Around the Bend T E Kinsey I can’t seem to get enough of these books at the moment, love the dialogue between the two protagonists Lady Hardcastle and her friend and maid Florence Armstrong


 

My Thoughts on Finding Dorothy by Elizabeth Letts.

Behind the most famous movie ever made is a tale of love, magic and one incredible woman


Finding Dorothy by Elizabeth Letts

Published by Quercus

The film of The Wizard of Oz, made in 1939 and which starred Judy Garland, was a magical film for me as a kid. I loved the yellow brick road, the songs, the scarecrow and the evil witch. I also enjoyed its (unofficial) 1985 sequel Return to Oz. That film terrified me more so than the first. It had rocks with faces, The Wheelers, Pumpkinhead, and a headless witch. When I read the books I felt the 1985 sequel was a lot more closer to its author L. Frank Baum original stories.
As I grew up I became interested in how the movies were made, Judy Garland and her life and in the writer of these magical books.

Finding Dorothy by Elizabeth Letts is a fictional story of a young Maud with her mother Matilda Joselyn Gage, an advocate of women’s rights, who first and foremost wants her daughter to get her diploma before engaging with the playwright actor and creator of Oz L. Frank Baum and the then elderly Maud on the filmset of the film of The Wizard of Oz. Maud meets the actors (normally whilst on a cigarette break) and tries to ensure the film script is in keeping to her late husband’s books, whilst protecting the welfare of a young Judy Garland.

What is as engaging is what happens in the intervening years between these two points. The story is written within the framework of what we know about the life of Maud and Frank, as well as their families.

Finding Dorothy has several different women characters in various circumstances. It demonstrates the hardships during the turn of the century and the growth of industry and land in America in the late 1800s. There is a lot in the book to think about. None more so than the question of rights that women had in the eighteenth century and later on in the nineteenth century.
Were women any better off, did they have more autonomy of their choices? Are the societal, the family values and traditions pressures any different?
I felt I had fallen right into a story of another time and era that had me enthralled and emotionally invested in its characters. I whizzed through this book.


20190915_155708_00002445118970095264582.png

downloads_wordmark_white_on_coral@2x3673987681953607516..jpg

Four Questions with Sophie Bowns ( @SE_BownsFiction )

janita-sumeiko-AprilFourQuestions529471

Sophie Bowns

  1. Tell us about you, and your writing (themes, influences etc.)

Hi Katie. I’m 25 and live in Cumbria. I’ve previously completed two years of student nurse training, but hated it so I left and moved back home and worked as a carer. I’m currently an Exam invigilator and I’m training to be a secondary school teaching assistant. I love it, no two days are ever the same, and there is never a dull moment.

I adore writing poetry. It’s something that I feel really passionate about. I always strive to wrtie poetry that evokes a thought process or an emotion within the reader. I love the work of Stephen King, Charlotte Bronte. In terms of poetry influences, I always try and read lots of work by other poets.

  1. What are some of the ways in which you promote your work, and do you find these add, or eat into, your time writing?

I post regularly on Instagram. For me, putting my poems on there is the best way to get them read. I also post the Instagram links on there. You can find me on both @SE_Bownsfiction

3.What projects are you working on at present?

I’ve been asked to be a part of a wonderful poetry anthology called ‘Luminance’ which will be available on Amazon as an ebook next month.

  1. What does poetry mean to you?

Poetry means a great deal to me. It’s rare that a day passes without me writing something. I strive to write poetry that evokes an emotion within my readers or makes them think. I am always trying to read work by as many poets as possible. It’s important that we support each other, especially with the awful new Instagram algorithm. I am determined to beat it.

luminancecover

This unique book brings together a collection of amazing and diverse poets who shine a light of words on a world gone wrong.
While global warming, poverty, homelessness, the refugee crisis and warfare dominate world news, the poets of LUMINANCE turn a spotlight on the frailty and hope of humanity.
The writers include a 32-year-old mum of four, a 16-year-old school student, a haiku writer, a freedom fighter, a 62-year-old grandfather, a modern day minstrel, a novelist and a self-proclaimed ‘mystic’.
Their poetry is breath-taking in its style, its range and its subject matter, falling nimbly into the categories: Darkness and Light, Heaven and Hell, Love and Theft, and War and Peace.
Most of the writers have, until now, only seen their work published on social media.
This family of contributors live and work 11,000 miles apart, across 18 time zones, in Australia, Bangladesh, Canada, Palestine, Japan, England, Scotland and five different states of the USA. Their writings display the diversity of their home cities and cultures and form the unique nature of the book.
Retired newspaper and magazine editor Nic Outterside from England, is the publisher of LUMINANCE.
“I have edited many publications over the years,” says Nic, “But none has been as challenging and exciting as this.
“I was lucky to have so many amazingly talented people contributing to this hugely diverse project.
“Their writing alone is breath-taking, but it doesn’t stop there… they were all brimming with ideas about the book, its publicity and ways to reach more readers than I ever believed possible.
“And we all hope you enjoy and share their end result… we think it has all been worthwhile.”
The writers of LUMINANCE are:
Anjali Love (Melbourne)
Annabel James (Oklahoma)
Austie Baird (Oregon)
Bridgford Hashimoko (Tokyo)
Brotibir Roy (Dhaka)
Hanalee (Arizona)
Heather Matthews (Ontario)
Joseph Nichols (Kentucky)
Megan Taylor (Inverness)
Nic Outterside (Wolverhampton)
Sophie Bowns (Ulverston)
Troy Turner (Los Angeles)
Zanita (Gaza)


tumblr_oqa8inOc1K1vuv1n1_r1_og_1280