Finding Henry Applebee by Celia Reynolds

Waterstones

Foyles for books

The story of Henry Applebee is primarily narrated by the man himself, although characters Ariel and Travis do take parts in being protagonists. The timeline of the story switches between past and present. I was unsure of this book at first, until I got the gist of which path the story was going to take. Not that it is predictable. There is a huge build up, you have to wait for it though. I liked the setting of the train station in the present and loved being in Blackpool for the past. This is a story of lost love and once you discover how Henry met this woman and lost her because of his insecurities (and mobile phones hadn’t been invented) it did make my eyes mist over.

Unfortunately, the story lost its way in its conclusion. I felt like the author was trying to repeat what happened to Henry with Ariel and Travis, who all meet on the train. I didn’t feel invested in the other characters as much. The ending is not automatically a happy one, which is realistic.

My final thoughts are I loved (ha) the love story in Finding Henry Applebee. The other parts not so much. It is set partly during World War 2, so if you like reading historical fiction books, I’m sure you will like this. I’m probably going to read this book again and love it.


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4 Classics on my shelf I still need to read

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Great Expectations by Charles Dickens – I thought this book was longer than it is. It’s actually a reasonable length. I’ve always struggled with Charles Dickens. I know his books are supposed to be humorous? I have never been able to recognise that, trying to get past some of the language and obviously society was different then. I did read Oliver Twist and I liked that one. I will give this a go. I’m sure I have already read some of it.


Howard’s End by E. M. Forster– I read a few pages and I had to put it back down. I find with some classics the way women are spoken of and to is too much. I like to chill with a book sometimes, not only for education and getting angry. I did read A Passage to India by this author, it was recommended by my English teacher at the time and that one I did enjoy. I will have to re-read that.


The Waves by Virginia Woolf – I love the way this woman writes, but. But this didn’t grab me. I put it down and haven’t gotten around to picking it up again yet. I read some of her books and I think I was too young to fully appreciate them. Like Orlando, didn’t get it. I read a lot of classics around the age of 11/12 and while I enjoyed them, I don’t think I fully appreciated when, why etc. they were written and about the writer. I think I just absorbed them.
I love the cover of this book, only cost 80 pence in the 70’s. If only books cost that now. I mean, postage costs a couple of quid.


Far from the Madding Crowd – I read Jude the Obscure when I was 16? Love the name Jude. That’s all it took for me to read it, the name Jude. And that was me done with Thomas Hardy. Done. Too much. Bit like poking a bruise, curiosity made me buy this one, I bought Jude the Obscure too, and perhaps I will read it. Will I re-read Jude the Obscure though? I’m not sure.


 

Thoughts on Footballing Memoirs by Cloughie, Taylor & Banks.

Originally published in 1980 and available now for the first time in forty years, With Clough, By Taylor is the definitive account of the partnership that revolutionised English football and the trade of the football manager.


With Clough, By Taylor

Published by Biteback
A story of the early relationship of the legendary football partnership of Clough and Taylor, their playing careers, their managerial careers, and the book caps off just as the pair were enjoying success with Nottingham Forest FC. The football club where the pair lifted numerous trophies.



Banksy

Published by Penguin
A fascinating insight into the early traditions of football, thoroughly well researched, and well written. The book gives a balanced view of life in Sheffield in the 1940s, society and its changes during the war, and how football was consumed, and reflected society as it was then, by the working class. You have to admire the dedication, and hard work that Gordon Banks put into training himself into the amazing goalkeeper that he was for Chesterfield, Leicester, Stoke and England. Gordon Banks gives us his experiences of that ‘66 World Cup win and the subsequent strange goings on during the ‘70 World Cup in Mexico. Astonishing read.


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Book Review. A Picture of Murder by T. E. Kinsey

  • A Picture of Murder by T. E. Kinsey

  • (Amazon Imprint) Thomas & Mercer

  • 1542046025 / 978 – 1542046022

  • Available on KU / print £4.99 / Free with Amazon Audible trial


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(P.S This review is completely contradictory, just so you know.

P.P.S. I received an ARC of this title from the publisher via Netgalley)

 

I was excited about starting A Picture of Murder. I liked the front cover and the description of the book, but unfortunately the story plodded along. It was seventy odd pages before the first murder happened, padded out with what I felt was an unnecessary amount of dialogue and stereotypical characters. The characters fell flat. I felt mildly compelled to finish A Picture of Murder, because I had no idea who was killing these actors, and the setting of the story, the period of time, the advent of moving pictures, and the ending did intrigue me. I also liked the character of Lady Hardcastle’s maid Florence. I feel I might have to read other books in this series to learn more about this sleuthing duo, and how their relationship has evolved, because I wasn’t very convinced by Lady Hardcastle.


Have you read A Picture of Murder, or any of the other Lady Hardcastle’s mysteries by T. E. Kinsey?


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