Links love.

I’m always keeping tabs open for all the interesting bits and bobs I have found on the internet: new book releases, poems in literary blogs, and that. Here are a few for this week.

The Pangolin issue 3.5 8 June 2018

The quality of the poems in this issue are 🔥 Read and learn from some fine writers.

The Blue Nib 5 poems by Isabelle Kenyon

Isabelle’s poetry is wonderful, so many layers, and parts to it. Her observations of the society we live in are insightful. I can’t wait to read more from her!

8poems.com

A relatively new venture, 8poems publishes 8 poems on their website every month. Their submissions are open, why not send them something?

Then I read something on The Bipolar Writer blog 5 excuses I used to deny my alcoholism which was written by Matt of Loudestminds.com Serious subject, uses humour.

Shirley Cuypers is one of my favourite bloggers. She wrote a post titled Top 5 websites every Blogger should use

I also wrote a blog post on depression this week, called What do you love about your depression? in case you missed it, and I had three of my travel micro-poems published by Spider Mirror Smoke Filled Rooms, Subway, and Fragile.

That’s all for now. Thanks for reading! Do share any of your favourite links this week in the comments.

Lunchtime Review. Peeking Cat 🐱 Poetry Magazine. The April Issue. Editor Sam Rose ( @writersamr )

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website

As always with Peeking Cat there is a varied selection of poems and stories from writers in Scotland to Bangor. I like the travel theme in this issue, particularly as it is coming up to *that* time of year.
The Rush to Relax by David Attree is a delightful rhyming poem on the experiences of travel: what to do with your hoodie, have you got your passport, luggage weight, the body scanner, and so on. Twelve Dark Days of Summer by Michelle Wray is a sombre depiction of a gloomy outdoor scene, of which us in the UK are quite used to. There are also song lyrics in A First Broken down Valise by Chris Rogers, an excellent prose piece in A Study of Frowns by John E. McBride, and a sobering story His Mistress by Rafael Pursley, in gardens, with flowers, used as metaphors for a troubled relationship.

Another fantastic issue of Peeking Cat Poetry Magazine.

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