A Film Noir student, John – Paul George ‘Ringo’ & the residents in a care home strike up alliances. In The Growing Pains of Jennifer Ebert: Aged 19 going on 90 by David M. Barnett.

  • Book Review

  • The Growing Pains of Jennifer Ebert Aged 19 going on 90

  • David M. Barnett

  • Trapeze

(ARC sent by the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review)

AMAZON / BN / WATERSTONES / INDIEBOUND

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Jennifer is a student, studying film noir. With student accommodation not yet built she is living off campus temporarily in a nursing home. The home is, somewhat, unique. It is home to five elderly residents and owned by the Granges. Joining Jennifer are fellow students Liverpudlian John – Paul George ‘Ringo’ and Bo Liu and Lling Liu.
There are a few secrets in the book, and I never knew which characters I could trust. Jennifer, in her opinion, is boring and so takes on a whole different persona in her new surroundings. She is so self-absorbed, I have to quote Hermione Granger and say ‘oh stop feeling all misunderstood,’ to her. She also lies about something HUGE, and when the lie is revealed she doesn’t seem to realise how wrong that it is. When will it click Jennifer?!


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Via GIPHY

The residents in the nursing home, on one hand, did feel like clichés, and Ringo did not convince me as a character, but are very amusing and I laughed out loud at a lot of their exchanges; with the discussions between the two groups about ‘when they were young’, Brexit and how the young are more self-absorbed than their generation. Typical stuff, really.
There is a mystery in the book, and I kind of felt the author didn’t know whether to go all in with that part of the story or not, and so I was underwhelmed by the ending as it seemed so at odds with other parts of the book, where all the residents are bonding, going out and getting drunk, and with everyone working together to stop the home from closing. There is a poignancy to the book, about aging, and loneliness, and in being happy with who you are, and who your family are.

I took from the book the message that our experiences from childhood, what beliefs we are brought up with, and the gripes and grudges we hold onto all our lives can impact us in different ways, leaving us unfulfilled. We must choose to change or remain entrenched in our prejudices.


This is Not a Spectacle. Isabelle Kenyon.

 

 

A copy of the gorgeous second edition of This is Not a Spectacle by Isabelle Kenyon. 

She also writes flash fiction. Her flash fiction piece The News was published by Selcouth Station and I was blown away. Read it here

Find Isabelle on Twitter @Kenyon_Isabelle or at her website here 


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Links love.

I’m always keeping tabs open for all the interesting bits and bobs I have found on the internet: new book releases, poems in literary blogs, and that. Here are a few for this week.

The Pangolin issue 3.5 8 June 2018

The quality of the poems in this issue are 🔥 Read and learn from some fine writers.

The Blue Nib 5 poems by Isabelle Kenyon

Isabelle’s poetry is wonderful, so many layers, and parts to it. Her observations of the society we live in are insightful. I can’t wait to read more from her!

8poems.com

A relatively new venture, 8poems publishes 8 poems on their website every month. Their submissions are open, why not send them something?

Then I read something on The Bipolar Writer blog 5 excuses I used to deny my alcoholism which was written by Matt of Loudestminds.com Serious subject, uses humour.

Shirley Cuypers is one of my favourite bloggers. She wrote a post titled Top 5 websites every Blogger should use

I also wrote a blog post on depression this week, called What do you love about your depression? in case you missed it, and I had three of my travel micro-poems published by Spider Mirror Smoke Filled Rooms, Subway, and Fragile.

That’s all for now. Thanks for reading! Do share any of your favourite links this week in the comments.

Poet Showcase. Linda M. Crate.

Hi everyone. I would like to share with you one of my favorite poets. Linda M. Crate is a prolific poet, and writer of fantasy. What I love is how empowering her words can be. Linda writes on subjects like sexual assault, suicide, and relationships, entwining them in ethereal, nature themes.

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You can read her recent poetry at Writing in a Woman’s Voice Cruel White Songs

I am All I Have

Anti-Heroin Chic You were Wrong

Another Way Round journal Lemons & Moons A Wildness that Never Sleeps Even I have Limits

Lit-Rally Your Judgments must be Proud

The Barishal Review 5 Haiku poems

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An interview at The Magnolia Review

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And if you like her poetry you can download for free her chapbook Heaven Instead at Origami Poems Project. This is a wonderful idea, where you can read poets chapbooks by printing them out, and folding them into your own books.


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You can also buy her books My Wings were Made to Fly ( Flutter Press ) and Splintered with Terror ( Scars Publications )

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Connect with Linda. M. Crate

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