do you love books in verse? i’ve written about why i do

 


Book Review

Toffee by Sarah Crossan 4/5

The poem format Sarah Crossan uses to write Toffee works well with the story. It covers important subjects too, such as abusive relationships, identity and peer pressure. I read it in one afternoon and couldn’t find any faults with it, other than it ended. Yep, that’s why I’m knocking a star off of my review, because the book ended – I am that petty (not really) 

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I love books written in a poem format. I think so many people feel poetry is niche, academic, boring, not something that is easy to understand etc. etc. and of course that is reflected in how poetry is taught to us. I remember all the silly poems that I read as a kid, which were was mainly rhymes. I grew up – thinking that’s all poetry was, rhyming. I studied two poems for my English GCSE. That made me hate poetry because we all were taught was to dissect these two poems. To find all these hidden meanings that the poems held. I mean, maybe the poet was thinking about his tuna sandwich for lunch and it isn’t that deep?
Therefore when I all of a sudden got these ideas in my head for poems after I had left school, I was shocked. Where has this come from? I thought. I wrote my first six poems. I started to read Allen Ginsberg. The rest is … history, as they say. There’s nothing that excites me more (well, there is pizza and a freshly made bed) than opening a book and seeing the poem on a page, ready for me to learn from. Because poetry inspires me, I just love the format now, it appeals to me. I love how expressive it is. I love how you can write poetry and it’s much freer than fiction, which seems stuck in rigid lines. Poetry really wiggles and jiggles on the page.

Yes, I know.

To return to my point, I think it is great that novels in poem or verse form are seemingly becoming more frequently published. It normalises it. And maybe more people will realise how cool poetry is.


Speaking of which I was recently approved for an ARC of Blood Moon by Lucy Cuthew and to be published by Walker books. I think it is released in September. I started reading it yesterday and omg, already in love and am only five pages in. The blurb I copied below and here is a pre-order (affiliate)link and add to your Goodreads here 

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A timely feminist YA novel in verse about periods, sex, shame and going viral for all the wrong reasons.

BLOOD MOON is a YA novel about the viral shaming of a teenage girl. During her seminal sexual experience with the quiet and lovely Benjamin, physics-lover and astronomy fan Frankie gets her period – but the next day a gruesome meme goes viral, turning an innocent, intimate afternoon into something sordid, mortifying and damaging.

Lunchtime Reviews Roundup. Poetry, Poetry, Poetry.

Blank Space

by Beth Bacon

Pixel Titles

 

author website // amazon (available on KU) // goodreads  

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Blank Space is a book similar to my own The Blank Page, in that Beth Bacon and I both explore the space in a book and its many possibilities. Blank Space follows the narration of a young child, encouraged to fill their journal in school, but struggles; the idea that the blank page does not necessarily need to be filled. It is a space to find rest. Blank Space uses its format very well. Using clear language, and colourful illustrations, whilst Blank Space is aimed at middle grade readers, I think there’s lots of appeal for older readers too.


Table for One

by Laura Ashley Laraque

Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

author website amazon (available on KU) goodreads

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Table for One is a collection of poetry on love, and giving yourself to someone so fully that you neglect your own needs ‘I have come to learn that the more you allow people to eat at your table for one, the more you’ll starve and never survive’ the book begins with a couple of poems where love between narrator and this person develops. From there the narrator writes from a place of perspective, and lessons she learnt for the reader to take away. The narrator gives their thoughts from love on beauty, her own voice and strength, ‘her heart became lighter her confidence became stronger and she only had to do one thing she had to say NO’ The narrator uses a dining experience theme, to centre the poems chiming the emotions of pain, regret, anger. This is prose as much as it is poetry too. The poetry stuck to a rhyming form, but I felt that made some of the poems too rigid.


Searching for the Truth

by Maranda Russell

author website // amazon (available on KU) // goodreads

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I enjoyed reading the thoughts of Miranda Russell in Searching for the Truth. Subjects covered were of of beliefs, forgiveness, injustice, nature, death, religion, our own personal journeys, amongst many more. Subjects I’m sure we have all had our thoughts on at some point, Maranda Russell has struck on universal truths. Life Without Art was a fantastic poem, posing the question what would life be without art? And the line ‘what would give us the courage to wake up each morning and face this dull, mediocre life?’ made me push a triumphant fist in the air. Seeking Truth was another such poem that I agreed with. As was Where you Should Be. Poems which give thought, or comfort. Searching for the Truth was a book I enjoyed immensely.
Mildew
‘Doubt is its own kind of mildew. You scrub and scrub to make it leave, only to turn your back –’


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