Finding Henry Applebee by Celia Reynolds

Finding Henry Applebee is only 99p on Kindle at the moment! Set in past Blackpool, historical romance – an emotional read.

Poetic Insights

Waterstones


Foyles for books

The story of Henry Applebee is primarily narrated by the man himself, although characters Ariel and Travis do take parts in being protagonists. The timeline of the story switches between past and present. I was unsure of this book at first, until I got the gist of which path the story was going to take. Not that it is predictable. There is a huge build up, you have to wait for it though. I liked the setting of the train station in the present and loved being in Blackpool for the past. This is a story of lost love and once you discover how Henry met this woman and lost her because of his insecurities (and mobile phones hadn’t been invented) it did make my eyes mist over.

Unfortunately, the story lost its way in its conclusion. I felt like the author was trying to repeat…

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Finding Henry Applebee by Celia Reynolds

Waterstones

Foyles for books

The story of Henry Applebee is primarily narrated by the man himself, although characters Ariel and Travis do take parts in being protagonists. The timeline of the story switches between past and present. I was unsure of this book at first, until I got the gist of which path the story was going to take. Not that it is predictable. There is a huge build up, you have to wait for it though. I liked the setting of the train station in the present and loved being in Blackpool for the past. This is a story of lost love and once you discover how Henry met this woman and lost her because of his insecurities (and mobile phones hadn’t been invented) it did make my eyes mist over.

Unfortunately, the story lost its way in its conclusion. I felt like the author was trying to repeat what happened to Henry with Ariel and Travis, who all meet on the train. I didn’t feel invested in the other characters as much. The ending is not automatically a happy one, which is realistic.

My final thoughts are I loved (ha) the love story in Finding Henry Applebee. The other parts not so much. It is set partly during World War 2, so if you like reading historical fiction books, I’m sure you will like this. I’m probably going to read this book again and love it.


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Spontaneous poem. When Blogging.

when blogging


to blog

first you must have an idea, however small –
ideas are like dough – they rise higher than you ever thought they would

then some courage is needed
to put the idea into words on a page

when they are words on a page, they must be edited –
not to perfection –
the odd typo –
let’s make it a puzzle to see if anyone who visits will notice –
(i certainly didn’t)

when cutting and pasting *remember* to keep formatting as it is –
and schedule it for next Friday
and not accidently backdate it to last Friday
(which i certainly didn’t do and never have)

Google popular tags and times of day best to post –
i still do this after 5 years –
you would think i would learn –
open Twitter & check hashtags other bloggers are using –
become distracted –

reading their blogs
and your TBR list has gained several new books –
oops, just like that

if it is a book review blog –
do include if the book was an ARC –
i promise my unbiased opinion –

make sure the post has images
and in preview –
check the paragraphs haven’t bunched together –

is the blog connected to social networks –
post automatically –

have i titled the post – no
no – think
for ten minutes
on something that will entice the reader – draw them in –
realise laptop is 2 per cent away from running out of battery –
save blog
schedule to post
and breathe.

@k_lpoetry


thank you for reading this spontaneous poem. if you want to read other poems, i posted one here a few days ago and another here last week. You could also become a subscriber of my Patreon and find lots of my poems on there.


 

my thoughts on 2 murder mystery books

 

 

The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie 4/5

murdera


Can you imagine how fun it must be (I’m kidding) sitting down and imagining … these murder scenarios? Do the writers fox themselves? Because characters, even if we do ultimately control them, still do what they damn well like.

I also love Agatha Christie’s dialogue. I think I have said it before in a review, but I bloody love good dialogue. It’s like music to my ears, when you read some dialogue and it has a bit of bite to it and a bit of humour. It’s pleasing. Roddy Doyle is another author that I like for dialogue.



rodoyledoors

 


I think I want dialogue to mirror real life. Which is why there are no rules to writing. You would have dozens of editors complaining if how we spoke to each other was put in our stories. It wouldn’t make sense. Unfinished thoughts, talking over one another, repetition, some coarse language. Of course, accents and dialects too. Do you feel perhaps in stories we try to replicate the perfect scenario? Isn’t that why we read stories, we expect a start, middle and end. I personally love reading stories that don’t really have a story, more happenings. I read a book a couple of months ago like that. It was Keith Waterhouse’s There is a Happy Land. It’s a beautiful book. I probably read it once every couple of years. I don’t have my own copy of it. I know where it is in the public library and I pluck it off the shelves periodically. Pluck is the wrong word. The shelves are packed tightly in my public library and it’s more of a shuffle, tug, pull, shuffle, break a nail and a yank. Then you realise it’s the wrong book and not what you want after all and have to get it back in.


happykeithbook


 

 

Anyway, The Murder of Roger Ackroyd was a hit with me. It’s all very clear and obvious whodunnit by the explanation at the end, isn’t it?


Another mystery I read was

Hate Bale: A Rural Cosy Mystery by Stephanie Dogg 3/5

hatebale
Hate Bale is very cosy. It has romance, humour and its setting and characters were different (depends what you’ve been reading, I guess) The murders though are brutal, when you think about what you are reading. The ending was wordy, and it went from 60 to 100 in the space of 3? chapters. I felt the plot and the pacing could have been tightened. It did meander, not that I mind a meander. Other readers may not.
Not a bad read though. I liked it.