Popular Song. Poem She’s a.

She’s a

published Anti-Heroin Chic
adult casual collection fashion
Photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com

people around her cycle like a cyclone
dancers creating the aura of a lead
you think wow blimey
i imagine she is popular
but i am not sure
her eyes shine too brightly
and her smile is too stretched
like get out of my way
you crazy idiots!
i want to be me

-You lose yourself in other people


Want more poetry? Try Here comes the Sun

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This is Not a Spectacle. Isabelle Kenyon.

 

 

A copy of the gorgeous second edition of This is Not a Spectacle by Isabelle Kenyon. 

She also writes flash fiction. Her flash fiction piece The News was published by Selcouth Station and I was blown away. Read it here

Find Isabelle on Twitter @Kenyon_Isabelle or at her website here 


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💭 My thoughts on Redeemable A Memoir of Darkness &Hope by Erwin James.

Title: Redeemable A memoir of Darkness &Hope

Author: Erwin James

Publisher: Bloomsbury

Pages: 355

Date Published: 11th Feb 2016

Rating: 🌟🌟🌟🌟

Amazon / Barnes &Noble / Book Depository / Waterstones / Foyles

One of the things I try to find in a book that is memoir is how that person, from great adversity, turns their life around. Whether that is from a childhood of neglect, or a kind of addiction, or something in later life that causes trauma. Often I don’t think anybody can pinpoint the turning point, because scars can run deeper than surface wounds, and regaining your self-worth, and achieving your goals, can’t be done with a snap of the fingers. With Redeemable A memoir of Darkness and Hope by Erwin James I felt that arc was easy to see. He had an unstable childhood, without any boundaries, after the death of his mother, and then he had problems with alcohol. His life spun out of control. Some of the passages of his years as a young man were harrowing. Eventually Erwin was arrested and sent to prison for murder. It was in prison his attitude began to change. That’s when therapy, talking to someone, and writing about his experiences while in prison helped him to make peace with his past, and himself. I found it inspiring. It’s never easy to change.


Poetry Files. Part 11 Signs from the old Times. From Mental Fight. By Ben Okri.

bookpoetrylewingtoncopyright

Fifty Strong Fifty poems chosen by teenagers for teenagers
Published by the South Bank Centre, London
Part 11 Signs from the old Times

From Mental Fight 

Ben Okri



What will we choose?
Will we allow ourselves to descend
Into universal chaos and darkness?
A world without hope, without wholeness
Without moorings, without light
Without possibility for mental fight,
A world breeding mass murderers
Energy vampires, serial killers
With minds spinning in anomie and amorality
With murder, rape, genocide as normality?
Or will we allow ourselves merely to drift
Into an era of more of the same, without shame,
Without wonder or excitement,
Just the same low-grade entertainment,
An era boring and predictable
‘flat, stale, weary and unprofitable’
In which we drift along
Too bored and too passive to care
About what strange realities rear
Their heads in our days and nights,
Till we awake too late to the death of our rights
Too late to do anything
Too late for thinking
About what we have allowed
To take over our lives
While we cruised along in casual flight
Mildly indifferent to storm or sunlight?


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Fem lit.

I have been reading a few excellent fem lit books over the last few weeks. I am not entirely sold on calling them fem lit, but as a rule I don’t really like slapping genres on books, because they’re merely labels. Here are the books.

I only discovered feminism four, five years ago. I have grown up in a very working class, women are wives, and mothers etc. background. There were no role models.

I feel as if I have been under a rock. As Laura writes in Girl Up once you start seeing everyday sexism it’s like you have put on a 3D pair of glasses. Situations I have felt uncomfortable in, and should have spoken up in, now make sense. I had the right to say no.

The world has been against us for centuries!

A collection with a feminist ethos that cuts across race, gender identity, and sexuality.

Creative activists have reacted to the 2016 Presidential election in myriad ways. Editors Danielle Barnhart and Iris Mahan have drawn on their profound knowledge of the poetry scene to put together an extraordinary list of poets taking a feminist stance against the new authority. What began as an informal collaboration of like-minded poets–to be released as a handbound chapbook–has grown into something far more substantial and ambitious: a fully fledged anthology of women’s resistance, with a portion of proceeds supporting Planned Parenthood and the Center for Reproductive Rights.Representing the complexity and diversity of contemporary womanhood and bolstering the fight against racism, sexism, and violence, this collection unites powerful new writers, performers, and activists with established poets. Contributors include Denice Frohman, Elizabeth Acevedo, Sandra Beasley, Jericho Brown, Mahogany L. Browne, Danielle Chapman, Tyehimba Jess, Kimberly Johnson, Jacqueline Jones LaMon, Maureen N. McLane, Joyce Peseroff, Mary Ruefle, Trish Salah, Patricia Smith, Anne Waldman, and Rachel Zucker.

They told you you need to be thin and beautiful.

They told you to wear longer skirts, avoid going out late at night and move in groups – never accept drinks from a stranger, and wear shoes you can run in more easily than heels.

They told you to wear just enough make-up to look presentable but not enough to be a slut; to dress to flatter your apple, pear, hourglass figure, but not to be too tarty.

They warned you that if you try to be strong, or take control, you’ll be shrill, bossy, a ballbreaker. Of course it’s fine for the boys, but you should know your place.

They told you ‘that’s not for girls’ – ‘take it as a compliment’ – ‘don’t rock the boat’ – ‘that’ll go straight to your hips’.

They told you ‘beauty is on the inside’, but you knew they didn’t really mean it.

Well screw that. I’m here to tell you something else.

Hilarious, jaunty and bold, GIRL UP exposes the truth about the pressures surrounding body image, the false representations in media, the complexities of a sex and relationships, the trials of social media and all the other lies they told us.

She Must be Mad explores coming-of-age: the pain and beauty of love, the relief and the agony of turning from girl to woman, the isolation of an untethered mind and the power and subjugation of the body.

Charly captures the formative experiences of today’s young women from the poignant to the prosaic in writing that is at once witty, wry and heartfelt. Wayward nights out that don’t go as planned; the righteous anger at those men with no talent or skill or smarts who occupy the most powerful positions in the world; the strange banality of madness and, of course, the hurt and indecision of unrequited love.For every woman surviving and thriving in today’s world, for every girl who feels too much; this is a call for communion, and you are not alone.