Spontaneous poem. When Blogging.

when blogging


to blog

first you must have an idea, however small –
ideas are like dough – they rise higher than you ever thought they would

then some courage is needed
to put the idea into words on a page

when they are words on a page, they must be edited –
not to perfection –
the odd typo –
let’s make it a puzzle to see if anyone who visits will notice –
(i certainly didn’t)

when cutting and pasting *remember* to keep formatting as it is –
and schedule it for next Friday
and not accidently backdate it to last Friday
(which i certainly didn’t do and never have)

Google popular tags and times of day best to post –
i still do this after 5 years –
you would think i would learn –
open Twitter & check hashtags other bloggers are using –
become distracted –

reading their blogs
and your TBR list has gained several new books –
oops, just like that

if it is a book review blog –
do include if the book was an ARC –
i promise my unbiased opinion –

make sure the post has images
and in preview –
check the paragraphs haven’t bunched together –

is the blog connected to social networks –
post automatically –

have i titled the post – no
no – think
for ten minutes
on something that will entice the reader – draw them in –
realise laptop is 2 per cent away from running out of battery –
save blog
schedule to post
and breathe.

@k_lpoetry


thank you for reading this spontaneous poem. if you want to read other poems, i posted one here a few days ago and another here last week. You could also become a subscriber of my Patreon and find lots of my poems on there.


 

4 Questions with Martin Grey.


1, Tell us about you, and your writing (themes, influences etc.)

 
I’m a Nottingham based performance poet and event organiser. I spent the best part of a decade writing poems I barely showed to anybody, before starting a now defunct poetry blog in 2011 and nervously taking to the stage for the first time in 2013.

 
My poems tend to be about little details and connections to people, objects and time, but I also write nonsense and found poetry when the mood takes me. I try to layer a positive social or political message into my poems, but generally prefer to leave it under the words for people to find. I consider it a compliment if three people read a poem of mine and take three different meanings.

 
I’ve always been drawn to nuanced and character focussed writing, especially in poetry and song lyrics. I used to blow my early teenage mind exploring all the possible meanings in 90s lyrics from the likes of Richey Edwards and Gruff Rhys. Today, I still find that poets who have had the most influence over my writing tend to explore these same themes. Mike Garry’s poem “Made in England” is a great example of this.
My writing is also strongly influenced by how many incredibly talented poets there are in the East Midlands. Just seeing great poet after great poet at an open mic is often enough to make me work extra hard on a poem, in the hope it can hold up next to everybody else’s!

2, What are some of the ways in which you promote your work, and do you find these add, or eat into, your time writing?

 
I promote through my social media accounts (instagram, youtube, facebook) and a website. While I do find these useful (it’s great if you want to get people to your event or livestream, for example), I also find they have limited value on their own, and keeping them active can be to the detriment of my own focus. All that said though, you should definitely follow me.

 
I personally think the best promotion, especially locally, comes from not actually promoting, but from being present, being genuine and being aware. Talk to people at events, give people confidence and a platform where you can, tell that instapoet why you liked their poem, make sure you’re on the mailing list, apply to whatever you can and be nice to people. I personally find these help create more opportunities and add time to my own writing, because they fill my mind with ideas and remind me why I love doing it.

3, What projects are you working on at present?

 
Quite a few at the moment. My first book, The Prettyboys of Gangster Town, is due out later this year with Fly on the Wall Poetry, which I’m super excited about!

 
I’m also closely involved with two local groups, DIY Poets and World Jam. At DIY we run quarterly events, monthly writing support meetings, and produce what we believe is the longest running free poetry zine in the country, although we’d love to meet a group with a longer running one. At World Jam we try to facilitate global poetry and music through events and workshops, by getting people together from as many different backgrounds, native languages and styles as we can.

 
I was also going to start bringing some spoken word theatre shows to Nottingham, but unfortunately all that has gone on hold at the moment. I guess I find it hard to say no to poetry things!

4, What does poetry mean to you?

As horribly cliched as this sounds, it really does mean the world to me, because it’s good for me in so many ways. It’s friendship. It’s belonging to a community. it’s being part of something positive and being able to help open doors for others. it’s educational, teaching me a lot about how other people feel and process what comes their way. It’s a therapist with unlimited time to help me come to terms with any difficult times I face. It’s also made me much better at taking constructive criticism!

 
On a different angle, it’s also a marker of how good something can be. In a great poem, the words seem to dance on the page or paint great works on the walls of the venue. There’s nothing quite like that breathe out moment, when somebody’s poem gets right into the blood cells of everyone in the room, and the only tools you need for that are a pen and the back of an envelope. It’s magic.


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4 Questions with Dane Cobain.

Dane Cobain

1, Tell us about you, and your writing (themes, influences etc.)

Sure! So my name is Dane Cobain and I write in a range of different genres and formats encompassing fiction, non-fiction and poetry. My books are quirky and a little bit weird, and I like to write things that reflect both my own life and the society in which I live. For example, my first fiction book, a supernatural thriller novella called No Rest for the Wicked, takes a look at the war between science and religion and how we’re all guilty of “sin” to a certain extent. My first full length novel, Former.ly: The Rise and Fall of a Social Network, is about a social networking site for the dead. You sign up, post updates that are visible only to yourself until you die, when your profile goes public.
For my poetry, I memorise and perform it and so it’s generally best read aloud. It uses a lot of stream-of-consciousness and wordplay as well as the sound of language itself to paint pictures. My poetry is arguably the most autobiographical of all of my work, and I’ve written about everything from anxiety disorder to binge drinking and getting freaked out by police dogs at an airport.

2, What are some of the ways in which you promote your work, and do you find these add, or eat into, your time writing?

I use a specific productivity routine that allows me to focus on different areas, so the marketing stuff rarely cuts into the writing time. Funnily enough, interviews like these come under my writing time because it involves me writing a bunch of answers, but it doesn’t cut into my time too much.
I’m pretty active on social networking sites and also have a mailing list, but I actually find that the main avenues for me to promote my work are my book blog (www.SocialBookshelves.com) and my BookTube channel (www.youtube.com/danecobain). I use both of them to talk about the books that I read, but it also increases exposure for my own books and helps me to get the word out there.
It’s a balancing act though, and I’d love to be rich enough and famous enough to be able to hire PR and marketing agencies and to only spend my time talking to national TV and radio hosts. At the moment, I’m not. So working on marketing and stuff myself is the only real option.

3, What projects are you working on at present?

As always, I have a bunch of projects on the go. The second book in my series of detective novels is edited and ready to go, but the first one has recently been picked up by a small publisher and so the rest of those are on hold until I figure out the lay of the land. The third one is already written and is currently going through its second of three rounds of edits, so I’m ahead of the game a little bit there.
As for poetry, I’m about 60-70% complete on my second collection, Kiss Kiss Death Death. That should be out within the next year or so, but we’ll see.
Finally, I’m working on a bunch of first drafts and plans for other stuff. My main writing project at the moment is my memoirs, which I’m tentatively calling “My Life in Books”, and after that I’m going to start working on a novel called Real Monsters, which I’ve been describing as Lord of the Rings meets Spinal Tap.

4, What does poetry mean to you?

I think Leonard Cohen put it best when he said, “Poetry is just the evidence of life. If your life is burning well, poetry is just the ash.”


eyeslikecobain

My thoughts on The Future by @Neilicorn @buttonpoetry


Publisher Button Poetry

Release Date April 3rd 2018

Average Rating 5.0 / 5 🌟



I have a feeling reading Hilborn’s book The Future he’s a really cool guy.
He writes a poem in this book called Bruce Springsteen will Never Die (which seems to affirm it) ‘I mean that the Reaper has Nebraska in his top five albums and won’t take the Boss because He also likes going to arena shows in Jersey,’ and ‘it’s going to be lonely for Bruce when we’re all gone,’ This poem pretty much makes the book for me. I love Springsteen, and I also love the way in which Hilborn writes. It’s conversational, and reads like a spiel of his thoughts. I like the story behind the book too. Hilborn wrote much of the poems while on the road, performing his poems. Hilborn also writes that the audiences helped shape his poems, so this book has had many editors. It’s why these poems do have an encompassing feeling of life lived. The subjects explored are nostalgia, sex, ‘it’s pretty hard to make
someone orgasm when you’re trying
to remember what you paid
for the couch,’
pets, being sixteen, and mental health. Hilborn writes a couple of poems about suicide, and the conflicting nature of it. ‘that place is called the world, and
if you want to live it’s really
the only option. You could choose not to,
but then
where would you get really great sandwiches or listen to Springsteen
with the windows down?’
I love sandwiches as much as I do Springsteen, so interesting viewpoints here.
In poem Welcome to Wall Drug, the words ‘whoever designed this place
was clearly very mentally ill, or
at least in my head,
so in my head it’s great to see that a crazy person
can put together something
so successful and beloved,’
are the exact same words I would return back to Hilborn, he does this with The Future for me. Two of my very favourite poems in this book are the title poem, which just had me shook, and Me, but Happy. This poem has become one of my favourite poems ever written by anyone, ‘I want to thank you for making all the love songs mean something again,’


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4 Questions with Natasha Head.

Natasha Head

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1, Tell us about you, and your writing ( themes, influences etc. )

A1. I’m one who writes because I always have. Sharing was never really the plan…but give a girl a blog and you just never know. I wrote my way through high school, careers, relationships. It would seem a journal doesn’t judge you quite as harshly as your peers. At the end of the day it will always be my therapy. And those pages are also very patient.

2, What are some of the ways in which you promote your work, and do you find these add, or eat into, your time writing?

A2. Promoting my own work proves difficult at best and I rely heavily on the networks to do so. It’s been ten years now, and the shallowness and selfishness has taken its toll. I now rely on Instagram which allows me to easily cross post and keep my few remaining accounts active. People are people even in their digital personas and people take a lot of time. I’ve had years of my writing life hijacked and have grown much more protective of my space. I’ve been fortunate enough to meet some incredible talent and these days I’m working a little harder at the real world version of myself. I’m a small town country bumpkin and proud of it. A small reading in a park, church, or library is an adventure in itself. It’s pushing my comfort zone…and as a result pushing my writing in a brand new way.

3, What projects are you working on at present?

A3. Right now my goal is to commit to my 4th collection. It’s been some time and focus shifts. I’ve been editing and reworking and making poetic excuses for far too long now. Locally, it’s library readings for me and hopefully connecting with a few local writers. I opened my own little curiosity/pawn/smoke shop with my family and I would love to open up the space to invite our local artists and writers to take part.

4, What does poetry mean to you?

A4. I love poetry because YOU, no matter where or what you come from, are a living breathing epic poem being written in real time. Some of us just choose to write it down. There is a poem for everyone, and it can be life changing when you find those words, that writer, that shares your story.