Book Review. The Dalek Invasion of Earth.

I think this must be one of my favourite Doctor Who episodes. It is the imagery that sticks in my mind. With the landscape of London, then the Dalek spaceship, and the mines. It’s a thrilling story too. There was a film, which starred Bernard Cribbins and Peter Cushing. That blazed across the screen in its glorious technicolour. I can’t remember it straying too far from its original story either and that is always appreciated.

As for the book adaptation, it doesn’t stop. There are no quiet moments, the Doctor and his companions get split up from the off and we get introduced to the Daleks and their slaves – the Robomen. There’s also the Slyther, which does sound better on paper than it did look in the actual episode. There are some characters I wish we could have had fleshed out more, such as Dortmund. Susan and David’s relationship does not really make sense. I guess that is why The Doctor made the decision to leave Susan behind, because I don’t think she would have wanted to leave her grandfather for a man she had only just met. It’s a more emotive moment in the TV episode, rather than on paper. I wonder, did the Doctor ever go back to find Susan? He must have done.

I have to also add as a new Who fan in 2006/7 and going back to watch the episodes from the 60’s, I love William Hartnell’s Doctor, and his companions – his granddaughter Susan and teachers Ian and Barbara. I thought it was a good dynamic, whereas with other Doctor’s and companions – too many in the group didn’t work as well I thought.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

A Who Review & a little bit about one of my first loves.

Doctor Who changed my life. I wasn’t an avid watcher when the iconic TV show returned in 2005, with Christopher Ecclestone as the time travelling Doctor, but t didn’t take me long to fall hard for the show though. One thing that the show taught me was that anything is possible, and that there is a lot more to our world than you could ever imagine. David Tennant played the role of the Doctor after Chris and during my teenage years, when I had depression and anxiety, the show became my escape.

The publishing imprint Target published books which were novelisations of Doctor Who episodes. They were first published in the sixties, and continued to be throughout the eighties, by various writers that had written episodes for the TV series. Nowadays that series of books have evolved, with a different publisher, hardback editions, and emerging writers writing the stories (a fan dream)

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So I was a little bit excited to find that the original Target books had returned, and feature novelisations of Twenty-First century episodes. Rose was the episode that started it all in 2005 and will always have a place in my heart. I can remember vividly how bloody creepy the mannequins that creaked and smashed their way from shop windows and onto the streets of London were. The bits that were cut from the actual episode are included in the book and add something new to the story. It’s also nice to read the story from Rose’s perspective and get a little more background of her and boyfriend Mickey’s childhood and what it was like for them growing up. I am not a huge fan of Rose’s character. I always thought she would have been one of the mean girls in school. Avoid.

I feel so geeky writing this review, because I was routinely taken the piss out of at school for liking Doctor Who waaaay to much. 😂 😭

Honestly, if someone likes something, and wants to talk about it for a few hours just be encouraging, and kind, not like ‘ha ha, you’re weird,’ Some of us are too sensitive for this kind of ribbing.


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