do you love books in verse? i’ve written about why i do

 


Book Review

Toffee by Sarah Crossan 4/5

The poem format Sarah Crossan uses to write Toffee works well with the story. It covers important subjects too, such as abusive relationships, identity and peer pressure. I read it in one afternoon and couldn’t find any faults with it, other than it ended. Yep, that’s why I’m knocking a star off of my review, because the book ended – I am that petty (not really) 

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I love books written in a poem format. I think so many people feel poetry is niche, academic, boring, not something that is easy to understand etc. etc. and of course that is reflected in how poetry is taught to us. I remember all the silly poems that I read as a kid, which were was mainly rhymes. I grew up – thinking that’s all poetry was, rhyming. I studied two poems for my English GCSE. That made me hate poetry because we all were taught was to dissect these two poems. To find all these hidden meanings that the poems held. I mean, maybe the poet was thinking about his tuna sandwich for lunch and it isn’t that deep?
Therefore when I all of a sudden got these ideas in my head for poems after I had left school, I was shocked. Where has this come from? I thought. I wrote my first six poems. I started to read Allen Ginsberg. The rest is … history, as they say. There’s nothing that excites me more (well, there is pizza and a freshly made bed) than opening a book and seeing the poem on a page, ready for me to learn from. Because poetry inspires me, I just love the format now, it appeals to me. I love how expressive it is. I love how you can write poetry and it’s much freer than fiction, which seems stuck in rigid lines. Poetry really wiggles and jiggles on the page.

Yes, I know.

To return to my point, I think it is great that novels in poem or verse form are seemingly becoming more frequently published. It normalises it. And maybe more people will realise how cool poetry is.


Speaking of which I was recently approved for an ARC of Blood Moon by Lucy Cuthew and to be published by Walker books. I think it is released in September. I started reading it yesterday and omg, already in love and am only five pages in. The blurb I copied below and here is a pre-order (affiliate)link and add to your Goodreads here 

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A timely feminist YA novel in verse about periods, sex, shame and going viral for all the wrong reasons.

BLOOD MOON is a YA novel about the viral shaming of a teenage girl. During her seminal sexual experience with the quiet and lovely Benjamin, physics-lover and astronomy fan Frankie gets her period – but the next day a gruesome meme goes viral, turning an innocent, intimate afternoon into something sordid, mortifying and damaging.

My Thoughts on Poetry, short stories and shapeshifter brothers oh my.

Witty, tender, surprising, these keenly observed tales speak to us all, and capture the moment when we all want to roar.

Roar by Cecilia Ahern

Published by HarperCollins
These stories from Cecelia Ahern are a departure from her novels (which I have a lot of time for) and they are chilling. If you look at the list of the stories, some of the stories are a literal as their titles suggest. The stories underline how women are invisible, whatever age: invisible once elderly, put to one side once married.
My one bugbear would be that the characters were all uniform. There was not a great variety in there.


Peppernell understands that healing is a process, and Pillow Thoughts II eloquently captures the time and experience that one goes through on their journey to peace through restoration. A collection of inspirational and comforting poems for anyone who is mending from a broken heart.

Pillow Thoughts 2 by Courtney Peppernell

Published by Andrews McMeel
I enjoyed the writing in Pillow Thoughts 2.
I liked that I could dip in and out of the book.
I found my problem was with the writing, which was impeccable, and an accurate portrayal of falling, and being in love, was so good I couldn’t connect with it, and almost couldn’t finish Pillow Thoughts.


Wicked Origins is a modern YA Fantasy Retelling of L. Frank Baum’s original Oz tales.

Wicked Origins by Paula Black
A retelling of The Wizard of Oz, Paula Black takes elements of the original story and adds them into her own tale. Black’s Dorothy is a hardened character, a child in care who doesn’t trust easy, and lives with Aunt Em and Uncle Henry, and sister. During a tornado her car is taking and lands in the place called Oz, along with her dog Toto. Instead of the Scarecrow, Tinman, and Lion her companions are three shape shifter brothers. The Ruby slippers that Dorothy puts on her feet to save herself from the Munch’kins are boots. The relationship of the brothers and Dorothy develops into a tight unit. I wasn’t convinced by some of the passages in the story. I liked the characters and the dialogue. I will be adding part two to my TBR.


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Wicked Rebel by Paula Black is out now & Book 1 in the Wizard of Oz Shape Shifter re-telling is on sale! Also enter to win an Amazon giftcard or PayPal cash.

I was just getting used to my life back
in Kansas, when I suddenly return to Oz, without Toto or the magic shoes
that put me here. Time operates differently in both worlds, and though
only four months has passed for me, more than two years have progressed
in Oz.

And in that time, I’d somehow become a legend.

One of my boys has become a king. And the other two have been taken
captive by the Witch of the South.

In order to stop a rebellion and help the shifter brothers, I have to
take on a new item of power and become something I never thought I
would… the Wicked Witch of the West.

Buy on Amazon or read in Kindle
unlimited

To celebrate the release of Wicked
Rebel, Book 1

is 99¢!

I have no idea what’s happening to me.
When a tornado dropped my car in a land of short, wild people, I was
shocked. With no way to get home, no idea where I was and no clue how to
communicate with the muchkins, I was completely out of luck. Then I
found out that my car had landed on someone and killed them. Supposedly
she was the Wicked Witch of the East.
If that wasn’t bad enough, now her ruby slippers magically appear on my
feet, and slowly, I’m becoming her.
Now I need to get to Emerald City and see the Wizard if I want to stop
the transformation and return home. But the yellow brick road is no
cake-walk, and I don’t know what I’ll find at the end of this journey.
Luckily, I have three brothers I meet along the way to help me on my
journey. Each of them is vying for my affection, as if it doesn’t matter
that my skin is turning green.
Wicked Origins is a modern YA Fantasy Retelling of L. Frank Baum’s
original Oz tales.

Buy on Amazon or read in Kindle
Unlimited

Grab
Book 2

Enter
to win May 2019 Fantasy and SciFi $100 Gift Card Giveaway


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Bookshelf Tour PT/1

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I don’t have as many young adults, or books from my childhood, as I did have, but my Harry Potter books have been with me everywhere. The spines are falling off, they are that well read. I remember being up and out of the door before the supermarket had even been opened to get my book every time a new one came out. I know it doesn’t seem a favourite among Potter readers, but my favourite book is The Order of the Phoenix.

Meg Rosoff How I live Now was a book I didn’t really understand when I was younger, and haven’t read it since, so I really should, shouldn’t I?

The Wind in the Willows is, obviously, a classic, but I do prefer the film Terry Jones made in the 90s with Steve Coogan and Eric Idle, probably because my memories are a lot stronger of the film than the book. I think once you have seen a film adaptation you can never un-see it. So you really have to be careful which ones you watch! I was so disappointed by the Harry Potter films.

The Outsiders is a book I previously didn’t like, but the book only cost me 35p in a charity shop and it was in awesome condition and it looked so good I had to have it. I read it, and I enjoyed the book a lot more on that occasion.

Cheesus was Here by J.C. Davis is a gorgeous hardback the publisher kindly sent me to review. While the whole idea of the book was great, plenty of comedy, grief and religion are the two key themes in this young adult book and they were written sensitively. It really reminded me of Hope was here by Joan Bauer.

Akea the Power of Destiny by Elizabeth Jade is a new children’s story of family and friendship. It’s a short read, but very good at packing in a lot of action and adventure.

The Benefits of Writing on our Mental Health.

Isabelle of Fly on the Wall Poetry was kind enough to invite me to write something for her blog, so I wrote about the benefits of writing on our mental health. This all ties in with the Please Hear What I’m not Saying anthology, which I have a poem in, and Isabelle is the editor of. It’s one of my positive poems, and goes something like

‘storm clouds part

and I can see

chinks of light appearing,’

But I won’t keep you! Go to Isabelle’s blog here and read the piece, which references Harry Potter, my experiences with depression and anxiety growing up, and how writing a young adult novel got me through my teenage years.

Oh, and the anthology has been shortlisted for the best anthology in the Saboteur Awards, so votes are needed. You can go here to do so, and find out all of the details.

Thank you!

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